Listening by Evey McKellar

Listening by Evey McKellar

Listening is a key component to effective communication in improv, to the work of collaboratively making scenes up on the spot. If I interrupt and speak over my scene partner, if I ignore what they say and offer to the scene, I have failed to listen. For example, they may make the suggestion that we are co-pirates searching for our shared parrot; I fail to listen and name us as sibling knee surgeons. The audience (always) notices the flub, we look foolish. We have missed an opportunity.


Interns of the Weeks: Kaitlin Sands and Brittany Stahl!

Raye Maddox here, Intern Manager, with the penultimate Intern of the Weeks for Season 2! We’re launching towards one HECK of a finale, and what better way to kick down that door with two of the most bombastic and radical persons who you might see from time to time: Kaitlin Sands and Brittany Stahl! Our House Interns are the Bones and Gears of Dallas Comedy House and every week House Managers nominated someone on their crew for Intern of the Week! This prestigious position comes with four tickets to any show, a nifty bar tab, and THIS BLOG:

Embracing Failure by Evey McKellar

Embracing Failure by Evey McKellar

Improv classes are a constant stream of new discovery and activity. A new warm-up is taught to the group, we learn it and try it, we practice and stumble. Someone messes up in the warm-up exercise, a rhythm gets off, someone whooshes instead of pows, we (of course) giggle. Big Booty resets when one of us fumbles. Laughter ensues. After all, we are standing in a circle ready with playful, silly energy.

Performer Of The Month: Logan Romero

Each month, the Dallas Comedy House highlights an individual nominated by their peers as Performer Of The Month. To cast your vote for a performer, simply fill out this form.

The inaugural recipient is Logan Romero, a hilarious improviser who can currently be seen in Brotherless and Roommates. Logan began taking classes in 2015 and immediately made a mark with his goofy personality and performance style. He is omnipresent at the theater, somehow able to see every show (Even if multiple shows are happening simultaneously, it’s kind of amazing).

Practicing Yes by Evey McKellar

Practicing Yes by Evey McKellar

On the improv stage, yes can transform two chairs and an empty stage into an imaginative scene of relationship and impossibility. With one audience suggestion, soon comes an encounter of a famous baby doing a book-signing, a law student in relationship with a cursed sorting hat, a couple arguing about giving birth to an avocado.

On stage, yes nurtures the fantastic and bizarre, the silly and playful and ridiculous.

Off stage, yes steps into the beauty, messiness, playfulness, and adventure of life. Yes embraces wonder, responding to the invitation into the fullness of life.