Lauren Davis

Comedians in Bars Drinking Alcohol

This blog series features interviews taking place at the Dallas Comedy House (DCH) with some of the funniest stand-up comedians in the area. Read to learn about your favorite local funny people and about the curious emotional makeup of people who like to go on stage alone every night to get laughed at. Lauren Davis

Lauren Davis: Human Friendster

Lauren Davis is a famous writer, famous comedian, famous improviser, famous sketch performer, and a famous dame about Dallas. But not for long, because she's moving to Los Angeles, a city on the west coast that's primarily known for its concrete import business and nothing else. I recently spoke with her at DCH after one of her open-mic sets, which like concrete, was a solid performance.

Thanks for meeting with me. You are the inventor of the popular DCH blog series "Comedians in Bars Drinking Alcohol." Yes, I don’t even know how I thought of it. It was like a flash of inspiration.

No one's ever done anything similar to it. You're in the shower and say, "Hey, that's a great idea." Exactly, I was shampooing, I think.

How did you select your comedians for the series? It was pretty arbitrary. I don’t know, usually it's like I have a conversation with someone maybe earlier in the week and I say, "Oh shit, I should interview them." It's very random.

How did you get started with the videos for it? That was totally Sean Alexander. He enjoyed the series, and he came and took beautiful pictures of everyone for a couple weeks and then he said, "I want to do a video, too." And because he's a dad and he’s a boyfriend and works a full-time job and does all these videography stuff on the side, he hasn’t been able to do it more -- well I’m leaving soon but if we got a sponsor in the next two weeks maybe we could do one more. He was great. He would set everything up. He did all the work and I got all the credit [chuckles].

What's the most interesting part of doing these interviews for yourself? It's interesting just to talk to people about stand-up. A lot of people who you'd never think would care and who'd never care when they're on stage get really nervous and really in their heads and you can see wheels turning. They're trying to filter, they're worrying about the clubs sometimes. It's just stand-ups being stand-ups, I guess and trying to spin and control the interviewed the same way they do their sets.

Lauren Davis

Let's answer some questions you would ask stand-up comedians in your series. What's the first joke you told? Oh no, embarrassing, but the first thing I said on stage I think -- I can’t remember my set. I was just drunk and talking, but the last thing was like, "And I have small boobs, bye."

My first joke was even worse. It was, "Having sex is like riding a bike, you never forget when you learn and you learn when you're five from your dad," and then no laugh and then it's like, "What? How old were you guys?"

What drives Lauren Davis to perform comedy? Oh geez, I can’t do anything else. I literary can’t do anything else. I don’t have a degree. I am really scatterbrain. I have a hard time focusing. I haven't even made it into a completely marketable skill yet, but it's the only thing I love. It's my passion.

What's your greatest fear? I guess shutting down. I’m probably getting too deep. I'm such an open book, though. There have been times in my life when I've been so depressed and anxious that I can’t function. Since comedy, it's gotten easier and easier to function but I worry about shutting down and not being able to do anything. I worry about my mind attacking me so bad that I can’t function.

That's a good subject you bring up because I think a lot of comedians and a lot of performers experience that. The panic attacks, the high anxiety, the depression, the, "I want people to like me." How do you overcome those feelings when you have them? I don’t know. How do you? I have no idea. I just go out and get more validation. It's not a healthy way to live.

For myself, you move toward the fear. I guess it's why it doesn’t scare me as much as it used to that I’ll shut down because it's like -- well now it's like everyone's scared all the time. It's just still showing up. It's not letting it stop you. If it's not scary, you don’t give a shit. 

You are moving to L.A. Boo, big yay. It's one of those boo-yay things. Total boo-yay.

Why L.A. and not New York or Chicago? New York seems more expensive and cold. I guess there's just more opportunities ideally in L.A. I'm hoping I’ll just fit in better. I love the community here but in LA, it's probably a lot of people who have worked themselves into a corner and don’t have any other marketable skills. They're desperate and grinding their asses off, trying a bunch of different things hoping that something sticks.

Hopefully, there'll be more projects, and I want to work in entertainment. It's only going to be a matter of time so I might as well go now because I’ll have to start over whenever I go.

Lauren Davis

What do you say the people who have trouble with the cliques in a community? For example, there are certain cliques -- people who always get picked for stand-up or people who always perform in sketch shows or picked for improv troops.

When I first started stand-up, there was one particular clique I got really jealous about because I felt like they looked down on everyone else. I was really frustrated. And then when I found my group of friends, people felt the same way about us and I realized it was unfair. 

You can make up stuff in your head all day, but I don’t think it's a ranking system. I don’t think it's about worth and you definitely shouldn't measure your worth by it. It's about people who work together who want to keep working together. Networking. I know I’m about to start new in the belly of the beast, but you find someone you like to ride with and you make a connection and then it's about once you find that moment of magic, of creating something great with someone or being understood by someone, I think that's what sparks this chain reaction of collaboration that continues to grow.

Our sketch group, Fraud City, it was so random that we were all in class together and we just had chemistry. I think that so much of it is just chemistry. 

What will you miss most about the DCH community? The incredible love and support. People care about fostering one another's growth and encourage weirdness and taking big risks. I love everyone. I could say a million things, but I'm just so in love with everyone. They're the most talented, kind people I've ever met. It's such a privilege and still so unreal to belong to it. It's magical.

Comedians in Bars Drinking Alcohol

This blog series features interviews taking place at the Dallas Comedy House (DCH) open mic with me and some of the funniest stand-up comedians in the area, most of whom just happen to be my best friends! Read to learn about your favorite local funny people and about the curious emotional makeup of people who like to go onstage alone every night to get laughed at. Jeremy SchmidtJeremy Schmidt: Smart Mouth

Jeremy Schmidt is an interesting blend of romantic and pragmatist. He's laser focused on excelling at comedy. He's sharp, competitive, and attacks every performance. But Schmidt is also an idealist who believes deeply in the transformative power of art. His concentration, incredible drive, and passion for comedy come through in his earnest, often wildly energetic sets. He delivers funny, inventive jokes and stories so descriptive and vivid they could double as flash fiction. Also he's just a really super friend and improv partner. You can see Schmidt at Fort Worth Hyena's October 29 at 8 p.m., on the "How's Your Dad" showcase at Dallas Comedy House on November 6 at 10:30 p.m., or catch us in our two-man show, Jeremy and Lauren Do You, at Dallas Comedy House on November 4 at 9 p.m.!

Jeremyyyyy! I just want the record to show I said video only, but I caved to do this not video.

We can do a Vine in the dark! Just multiple Vines that string together to become one long, giant interview.

Do you wanna do that? I don't know if it would work.

What was your first set like? It was good. My second set was terrible.

You and Alex Gaskin kind of like attacked from the beginning. You started creating your own open mics and shows almost immediately. Yeah, more Alex than me, but I definitely jumped on his shows. More his shows, but I'd help with the lineup and sh** like that. And y'know, we started older, not being super young, so we didn't make a lot of mistakes that people make when they're starting. We immediately realized if we wanted to do shows, we'd have to make them ourselves.

Do you take that DIY attitude toward what you're doing now? Nope, and I kinda didn't then. I work on whatever I want to work on, and kind of don't care about anything else that's happening. I try not to, anyway. Sometimes it starts to creep in, like, "What's the show I'm on this week? Who's it with? I don't like these people." Or like, "I hope I do good tonight!" But most of the time, I try to keep it very pure. Stand-up is like a very pure thing, where it's like, "Oh, I'm gonna go up to work on my own thing and I don't really care about anything or anyone else." For me, when I get onstage and see an audience, that's the only thing I care about in that moment.

You've always had really smart and dense material. Was it frustrating at first if the crowd couldn't keep up with you? Well early on, a guy told me not to be smarter than the room.

Who? Off the record? It was Butch Lord, you can publish it, I don't care. It was good advice, because who CARES if you have a Great Gatsby reference in your joke if nobody gets it. It doesn't make you feel better, it doesn't make you grow. Stand-up, I've found out recently, is about connecting, and it doesn't matter how you get there, as long as you connect. If you're like really smart, like a John Hodgman, or like a Chris Farley, you're gonna fall down and puke, whatever, as long as you connect.

How did you become more accessible without compromising your voice? I guess by understanding what a joke was. How to write a joke and be a part of a joke. I mean, you probably had this problem, writing bits that were too smart, or alty, and what did you do? You dumbed it down, right? It feels bad, right?

I don't feel like you do that, though. No, I try to work around it, I work really hard to get it in there. I won't throw out a very timely, poignant reference just to get people on board with it. And lately I've tried not to reference things at all, just reference myself. I learned that from - you were in A.A., recovery programs you're taught to talk about yourself. Talk about you, make "I" statements. Like with stand-up, and improv, too, take care of yourself. If you're a full character with a backstory, that helps everyone else onstage out.

How has improv helped you with stand-up? It's helped me to focus on that relationship. Instead of liking being with the people in my troupe, it's with the audience. We are all "yes and"-ing in a room together. You're going with me on this because I'm helping you go with me on this by giving you information. I also do a lot of crowd work, too, like talking to people in the audience and engaging with them.

What's your favorite bit you're doing right now? I'll tell you the bit I'm working on right now, it's all about dads. Just like what kind of dad I would be, y'know. And I really like the idea of just saying "Dad" a million times onstage. Isn't that kind of weird? You ever write a bit, and you're like, "I just want to say 'cornrows' tonight." On Tuesday, all I wanted was to say cornrows onstage. Like how important do you think you are? Like really answer that.

Umm... medium? The thing is, when people watch you, you're the most important thing that exists onstage, and the light hits your hair, and you're just walking around onstage so badass and you look like something somebody wants to hang out with. At least! It doesn't matter what you're saying, as long as I get to know you, just a little bit. Like you feel like, "I just had sex with you, just a little. Like we kinda just got together."

Lauren Davis is an improviser and stand-up comedian from Dallas, Texas. She can be seen weekly performing improv with her troupes LYLAS: Girl on Girl Comedy and Please Like Us, as well as doing her stand-up act at clubs around the area.

Comedians in Bars Drinking Alcohol

Dalton Pruitt This blog series features interviews taking place at the Dallas Comedy House (DCH) open mic with me and some of the funniest stand-up comedians in the area, most of whom just happen to be my best friends! Read to learn about your favorite local funny people and about the curious emotional makeup of people who like to go onstage alone every night to get laughed at.

Dalton Pruitt: Audience Wrangler

Dalton Pruitt is one of the most consistently funny open mic-ers in Dallas, which is all the more impressive considering that's he's the ripe old age of 21 and has only been doing comedy for a year and a half. Pruitt's profound eloquence brings gravitas to his jokes about subjects such as sleeping with your cousin, the circus, and some truly disgusting puns, which he delivers in his native Southern twang. A devoted writer who is entirely committed to doing what he thinks is funny, Pruitt's unique and irreverent comedic voice is one of the most fresh and interesting that Dallas offers. I crouched with Dalton under the steps at Hyena's last night and we talked shop.

Dalton! Where did you start comedy? I started in Denton. There was this place called Banter in Denton, and I was really terrified. And I sat there for several hours, holding my notes, shaking. Then it went well, when I finally went on.

Did you have friends there? No. I was alone. I pulled myself out of my apartment actually. I wasn't leaving my apartment at the time. I was really depressed.

You were a student then? I still am and probably will be for the next 15 years til I figure out what I want to do. It didn't go terribly. You hear all these stories about people's first time going up, how it was a bomb. I've certainly had bombs, but that town was so bereft of comedy. The fact that I just sat down and wrote jokes.

Comedy does seem a little more amorphous there. Here's what I'll say about that town. I did comedy six, seven months before I came out here, so I've only been doing comedy in the big city for about a year. Honestly, what that town did, having no frame of reference for comedy, it gave me every bad audience you could think of. And then I came out here, and I was like, "Oh, they're listening."

Because there wasn't any comedy clubs, just coffeeshops and bars. People would come to open mics, but they were there to drink and mostly listen to music. Comedy requires people to pay attention, while music just needs people to be drinkin'.

It was a lot of crowd wranglin'. When I got out here, it was a treat. I still love doing shitty bar shows. (pause) This feels weird, because like... we're friends. I feel like I'm trying to be too professional right now. Everything I just said I felt like I was trying to talk like I'm in an interview, which I am.

Well, a lot of people do that because it will be published. I just realized I was Charlie Rose-in' this sh**.

The most impressive thing you can do in one of these is to somehow make it funny. That's what I'm worried about is I'm gonna be a complete dullard. You would be astounded at how boring I really am.

Is it weird going to school and being around young, smart people who aren't comics? I'm taking two classes right now, and I'm actually afraid to speak in class because I don't want to overpower. I'm so used to always just trying to be on, I don't want people to think I'm trying to be the class clown, be the performance artist, the entertainer, in an environment where it's completely inappropriate, where everybody's paid $1,100 to be in there.

What are your goals in comedy? You're very funny. Right now, I just want to work on getting talented and getting funny. It's weird because obviously I've killed before, I feel weird. I don't want to let any good set get to my head, and I'm afraid to admit I'm actually good at anything. But yeah, just like any artist I just want to get better at it. I just always want to entertain people and be funny. Ideally yeah, this is what I want to do for a living.

I'm trying to write more outside of stand-up. Do you find that writing your short stories for college helps you with comedy? Oh yeah. Writing helps with any artistic endeavor. Just sitting down and writing anything, your thoughts, trying to write out a scene. I think that's where a lot of folks will suffer in trying to be creative, especially in comedy. They just don't sit down and write enough.

You get lazy in your writing, your five minutes you've been doing and that's all you do. There's one chapter of a book that I've read, it's called The Artist's Way by Julia Cameron, and it's just one of these dopey spiritual exercises, but she says sit down every day, preferably in the morning, and just jot down three pages of whatever nonsense you can think of. So I'll do that, and then if I feel like I want to write more, I'll either keep journalling or I'll try write a story or just jokes or just premises, just ideas and whatnot.

Especially when you sit down and write with a pen, this is where I get all hippy dippy on you, because everyone nowadays has their f***in' phone, or their computer, and they're click-clacking. There's a disconnect, to me, there is. I don't want to be the artsy-fartsy type, because that's not how I do things but there is something about putting a pen to paper that seems to help me.

Let's talk about your Facebook performance art of you shirtless eating stuff. It's just a joke! You interviewed Brandon and Tyler, and they told me something you said that I think is f***ing hilarious. You said, "He is so brave for doing that." And I'm like, I don't know what's brave!

I meant it jokingly, like referencing what people said about Lena Dunham when she first started getting naked on Girls. But if I had a six pack or was a woman and was [taking my shirt off and eating things], people would be like, "Rock On!"

But someone like that would be doing that for a different kind of attention. Still, it wasn't like a body acceptance thing, it was like me being goofy. I don't think you should accept a sh***y body, I mean, this isn't healthy! And we've talked about this before, with Facebook notifications you get that dopamine drip. I mean, if I could show everyone my d*** on Facebook, I'd show everyone my weird, fat guy d***.

Lauren Davis is an improviser and stand-up comedian from Dallas, Texas. She can be seen weekly performing improv with her troupes LYLAS: Girl on Girl Comedy and Please Like Us, as well as doing her stand-up act at clubs around the area.

Comedians in Bars Drinking Alcohol

Clint Werth This blog series features interviews taking place at the Dallas Comedy House (DCH) open mic with me and some of the funniest stand-up comedians in the area, most of whom just happen to be my best friends! Read to learn about your favorite local funny people and about the curious emotional makeup of people who like to go onstage alone every night to get laughed at.

Clinterview: The Werthening

The Dallas Observer Awards are pretty much any local comedian or comedy club's best chance to get any recognition outside of the comedy community. They have good taste, too! Not to toot our own horn, but the Dallas Comedy House was voted "Best Comedy Club," and the headliner of our most recent stand-up show, Clint Werth, was voted "Best Comedian." The "hilarious animal" is modest about his second time winning the magazine's accolade, but earnest and optimistic in his goals for both continuing to build his own burgeoning career and the Dallas comedy scene as a whole. I sat down down with the focused and whip-smart comedian and learned about his realistic, punk rock approach to creating funny things to say and finding an audience who's interested in hearing them.

Clint Werth. 2015 Best Comedian in Dallas. According to the Observer.

The Observer of all things Dallas! They observe.

How has your life changed in the past few weeks? Not much.

(long pause) I wanted to do like a fake jokey interview. Oh. That might work better with video.

Welp, what do you have coming up? I never see you at open mics anymore, and I always wonder how you still stay sharp and funny. I've got that Halloween show [at the Kessler Theater], then all the bar shows. That's really what I've been focusing on. Booking, hosting, and putting together a good show.

How do you polish though? Are you at a place with writing where it just comes out super polished? Well, I don't write very much. It sucks, because I've been doing the same material for the past two years, but I've tweaked it all and I'm constantly doing it. If I get out of my head and look at other comics who are in the 10-year range, they've been doing the same stuff. Any big name, unless they have an album or something that's an impetus to put it out there, there's not really a change.

I definitely get in my head because comics release albums and specials so frequently now. I'm like, "Is everyone Louis C.K. now? Writing a new hour of material every year?" He definitely set a bar for how often you should. You have the comedy boom in the 1980s that busted, and now you have this new boom that's based of, not comedy clubs, but Twitter, and podcasts, and all these other different things. And if you're really into Louis C.K. and you go on YouTube, there's 1980 interviews of him on Opie and Anthony, just one radio show even, and you can see the prototypes of bits that he's developing and he's constantly working on stuff.

Do you also do that through social media? Not in awhile, but what I loved about Twitter was it forced a certain brevity on me. I believe it's easier to tag up and build from that foundation than take a story, cut a story down, like at the end of Apocalypse Now when they're hacking the water buffalo to death with machetes. When you get down to that hardcore skeleton of a joke, that thing you think is funny because you know your cousin Eddie, it isn't funny anymore.

Do your followers come to you, or do you strategically try to follow comics or writers you like who you know might notice you? It's a little bit of both. If there's anything you can attribute to my success it's that I work just as hard behind the scenes as I do on stage. I have certain weaknesses as a performer, such as that I don't like being up there.

What people don't see is all the shit that goes on behind the stage, and just to get myself out there as a comedian, I have to play all these other roles. I don't feel bad doing all these things, because I'm not going through the traditional structure. That's what I say about the Observer; it's the alternative weekly. I've read it for 15 years; it's underground. So if someone was named Dallas Morning News' favorite comedian, I wouldn't care!

Yeah I don't care who Steve Blow's favorite comedian is. You've totally done it your own way. Would that be your advice? They're always gonna tell you, "You have to be funny to everyone." And I think that perfectionist mentality, where you have to please everyone - I mean, there's people who didn't like Johnny Carson! Not everyone's going to like you, so you have to take a long look at yourself in the mirror, and say, "Who am I, and who am I trying to reach?" You have a specific audience, and find out who that is. It can be a very broad category. You can reach out for the youth, because I think the youth is the most under-served demographic in comedy.

Comedy caters to people with money, like anything else people are selling. It caters to people our parents' age, that's what's on Comedy Central. But then you see things on MTV, and you're like, "This is completely insane! I don't get it!" But if you're still young, talk to them! If you're still young, try to do NACA [National Association for Campus Activities], you age out of that at about 34. New Faces, you age out of that by the time you're my age.

And set realistic goals. Whoever it is in your mind who's the biggest guy ever, you're not gonna be that. But there's a reason that guy appealed to you but he didn't necessarily appeal to everyone else. And to you, he's bigger than a God, but he's still thinking like anyone else, "I hope I get people to go to the Thursday show, I heard the last guy only brought 15 people."

What's your next goal you've set for yourself? I want - and this is gonna sound really artsy-fartsy - I want to build a comedy culture in Dallas, like the way they cover music and the way they kind of cover art, they sorta cover comedy. And they don't right now. I believe the comedy scene as it is only exists in the minds of comedians because there are no regular crowds.

This is the weird duality of Dallas. A lot of really great people have come from here, but they're always from somewhere else. The only real native son Dallas has is Paul Varghese, so whatever comedy culture Dallas can have has to hinge around him, so how do we extend it to everyone else, and how do we keep it fresh and current and cool?

Finding cool people with cool bars who are willing to take a chance on comedy. Comedy needs to be nurtured, and there's nothing here, there's no infrastructure - I mean, there's the clubs.

The comedy we got post Comedians of Comedy, podcasts, Twitter - those comedians have not gone that route. There's very much a DIY aspect. Even if you are working clubs, you have to have built your own fan base. Until they're willing to work with you as a headliner on an even level, you're going to be grossly undervalued. You've got to say, "Hey, I'm going to find out who I actually am, who I appeal to, and make it happen." And it's so f***in' easy. I am so f***in' lazy, and the fact that I've done what I have done should make people embarrassed.

Lauren Davis is an improviser and stand-up comedian from Dallas, Texas. She can be seen weekly performing improv with her troupes LYLAS: Girl on Girl Comedy and Please Like Us, as well as doing her stand-up act at clubs around the area.

Comedians in Bars Drinking Alcohol

This blog series features interviews taking place at the Dallas Comedy House (DCH) open mic with me and some of the funniest stand-up comedians in the area, most of whom just happen to be my best friends! Read to learn about your favorite local funny people and about the curious emotional makeup of people who like to go onstage alone every night to get laughed at. Beth StellingBeth Stelling: Rising Star

Beth Stelling's got heat. Within the last week, Stelling recorded an album, was a guest on the popular Earwolf podcast Who Charted, and headlined two shows at our very own Dallas Comedy House. The effortlessly charming and personable Stelling put on a hilarious show and was just as delightful and cool offstage. I asked Stelling about her remarkable career and milked her for advice for aspiring stand-ups, which she kindly and candidly gave.

Beth: I love when they use the photo I ask for. I'm the type of person who's like, I'm not picky, whatever, my whole Australia tour they use a photo from 2011. It's just like, "I like that photo of me! Thank you!" It's from Best Fish Taco, it's an outdoor show in L.A. They just take your photo on a patio. It's nice; it just looks like me.

You look breezy! Easy breezy.

What got you started in comedy? I started in Chicago in 2007. I'd moved there to be an actress. I was going to do stage and be a theater actor. I'd interned two years prior at the Steppenwolf Theatre. And in Chicago there's a lot of storefront theater that's just shit, and then there's like, Steppenwolf, Goodman, and it's hard to get into those top-tier ones. I found myself doing a shitty play, and no one came, y'know what it's like, no one comes, it's not that great, you're rehearsing a couple months for like a hundred dollars, and I mean I didn't do it for the money. I was working at a bagel shop. I always had so many jobs until I figured out what I wanted to do, but I went on one audition where I forgot my monologue. It's what I studied in college, and I was like, "I can't even do this!" It wasn't like a breakdown, it made me so nervous, and honestly the guy who was doing that audition was kind and wanted me to do well. It wasn't like I was run out of town. But I was like, "What am I doing? I'm auditioning for stuff that I don't even know if I like!" And I was working at the bagel shop, and my boss thought I was really funny, and was like, "You should do stand-up." I'd tried it before I left for school, so it wasn't like I was a stranger to it, but I tried it maybe like three times. Then I started stand-up, I was like, "I'm going to write my own stuff."

Do you like that more than acting, being able to have your own voice instead of saying someone else's words? Yeah, some of my most enjoyable acting jobs are with friends or people who know me, so they know me and my style and what I bring to it, or things that I've written with friends that I get to act in. With auditions, it's weird, you do them to see who you are, but also you want to be what they want. It's such a weird combination of things.

Whereas with stand-up, you're more in control. You're in complete control.

When did you decide to move to L.A.? I did stand-up for four years in Chicago. I'd gotten some things that had helped me along the way, a couple awards. I got Just for Laughs Montreal, New Faces. So that was the impetus for me to move to L.A.

How was that? That was such a big deal to me. I look back now and I say, I wish I'd looked at it a little more lightly now that I know that it's less of a big deal. People ask me now, "Hey, I'm a New Face, can I get on your show?" and I say, "Congratulations, that's a huge accomplishment." But even then, there are things that happen with that. It's not always the best person who gets it, and political reasons. I'm not trying to say I avoided them, but I'd worked for years.

Do you have any advice for new stand-ups? Sure, there are some things that come to mind. Do what you think is funny, what makes you laugh. If you're doing stuff just to make other people laugh that you don't necessarily enjoy or think is funny, then you're going to be stuck doing that for a long time and you're going to hate what you're doing. Keep doing what you think is funny and stick to your style. I used to be called quiet - why do you whisper your punchlines, you're not a real comic - I wasn't trying to be a gimmick. I wasn't trying to do a funny little voice, but it's just what came out of me. If you do that, people are going to come to you. It might take a decade, but a crowd will come to you. And you'll be doing what you want, so you'll be happy. And I'm not in a rush. I set goals, and I reach them.

But in general, I'm enjoying the ride. Nobody listens to their sets when they record them so don't beat yourself up. Do record your sets, though, to have the option. Try to hang, spend time with other comics. Try to see the city you're in, and I'm saying that because I want to do it more. I tend to stay in a hotel room and watch TV. I would maybe try to avoid...try to work clean at the beginning so you know you can do it. And try not to sleep with other comics, at the beginning, until you're on your own, two feet. So you can't get called somebody's girlfriend just because it happened. Don't let that happen to you.

This is all stuff I've done. But it's not a dealbreaker! That's my advice.

Lauren Davis is an improviser and stand-up comedian from Dallas, Texas. She can be seen weekly performing improv with her troupes LYLAS: Girl on Girl Comedy and Please Like Us, as well as doing her stand-up act at clubs around the area.

Comedians in Bars Drinking Alcohol

This blog series features interviews taking place at the Dallas Comedy House (DCH) open mic with me and some of the funniest stand-up comedians in the area, most of whom just happen to be my best friends! Read to learn about your favorite local funny people and about the curious emotional makeup of people who like to go onstage alone every night to get laughed at. Angel Rosales: Serious Comic

Angel Rosales is one of the funniest people in Dallas. His Twitter, @angelcomedian, is evidence of his dark, biting sense of humor and aptitude for writing terse, brilliant one-liners. But Angel doesn't coast on his natural hilarity - he works incredibly hard to write the strongest material he can and deliver his best performance even at the most sparsely attended open mics. His commitment to making excellent work hasn't gone unnoticed. He consistently works as a host for the Hyena's night clubs in Dallas and Fort Worth. A naturally charismatic guy and a dedicated craftsmen, Angel is the kind of guy who makes me want to be a better comic. I sat down with him and we had a beer and talked shop, and fellow worker bee Sean Alexander of Creww Media directed and produced.

Lauren Davis is an improviser and stand-up comedian from Dallas, Texas. She can be seen weekly performing improv with her troupes LYLAS: Girl on Girl Comedy and Please Like Us, as well as doing her stand-up act at clubs around the area.