Netflix

What We're Loving: Prepared Material, True-Crime, Fake Crime

Each Friday, DCH performers, teachers, and students offer their recommendations for what to watch, read, see, hear, or experience. This week David Allison can handle the truth, Jonda Robinson likes it real, and Rachel Hall assigns homework. 10270314_10152469666271935_5549480507233317716_nAs someone that performs comedy at the theater for which this Internet page exists, I have been known to use this weekly space to talk up shows that I’m doing. This week, I’m breaking all the rules, because what I’m loving is a show at the Dallas Comedy House THAT I AM NOT IN. I know, I didn’t think it was possible either. What I’m loving is !Cambio Cambio!, the latest sketch revue at DCH.

Sketch comedy is something that the Dallas Comedy House put a lot of effort into teaching in 2014. There is now a three-level program in place, from which you learn what it takes to put on a sketch show AND you get a four-week run for whatever revue your class created. In this case, the class put together a smart showcase that does a nice job of mixing funny moments in with truth. A favorite scene was where a pig must leave it’s owner to live life on its on terms.

Once this goes up, you’ll have two remaining opportunities to see the show (12/4 and 12/11 at 8pm). And once you check it out, sign up for the sketch program! You’ll learn a new craft and grow as an actor.

OH! And if you want to sign up for sketch or improv classes, then take advantage of the Black Friday sale coming up. You save $50 off of any class at the Dallas Comedy House if you buy them the day after Thanksgiving. Do it! - David Allison

serial-social-logoI have always been a fan of true crime stories. As a teenager I was fascinated by Ann Rule’s book, The Stranger Beside Me, in which she recounts her true story of working on a crisis hotline with serial killer Ted Bundy and slowly realizing that he was the murderer everyone was looking for. Later it was Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood that drew me in with its beautiful prose and ghastly tale of murder in a Kansas farmhouse. Nowadays, If I run across Dateline telling the sordid details of some relationship gone wrong, I can’t pass it up.

Considering all of this, the currently popular podcast Serial is right up my alley. I started listening to it this week, and I’m so intrigued by all the details. The podcast features host Sarah Koenig (producer for This American Life) investigating the details of a true story over the course of a season. Currently she’s looking into the 1999 murder of high school senior Hae Min Lee in Baltimore. Hae’s ex-boyfriend, Adnan Syed, who was 17 at the time, is currently serving a life sentence for the crime. As the story unfolds over each episode, new details are unraveled that call in to question what really happened. Is Adnan really the killer? Did the jury really get all the information? There are lots of twists and turns along the way that so far have provided more questions than answers. I’m really, really hoping we get answers by the end.

I highly recommend checking out Serial on your daily commute, or run, or lunch break, or whenever you preferred podcast time is. If you’re anything like me, you’ll move quickly through the episodes in search of answers, making your own assumptions and hoping that truth will be found. - Jonda Robinson

TheFollowingNetflix is awesome! Duh. Nothing new there, Rachel. Yes, we all know Netflix is awesome until it isn't. Who hasn't discovered the greatest show of all time, binge watched all seven seasons in one week, then the complained about how dumb Netflix was because there is nothing to watch! Well, I am here to fix your Netflix blues with the current greatest show of all time—The Following.

Not to long ago at work, I stumbled into a conversation that was not Game of Thrones, Scandal, or The Walking Dead related; these are all shows I started and am now hooked on due to peer pressure and a need to feel like I belong. The show they were discussing was called The Following starring Ren McCormick (a.k.a. Kevin Bacon). It centers around a extremely handsome and british serial killer named Joe Carroll and his cult of aspiring killers. Essentially the show goes like this (don’t worry there are absolutely no spoilers, so please continue reading). Years ago a detective, Ron McCormick, looking to make a name for himself in the FBI, devotes his a career to catching a serial killer who is terrorizing a college town. The killers’ victims are all women in their early 20s, the weapon used is a knife, and the signature of the killer is removing the victim's eyes. Did I mention this show is normally aired on FOX? Through some great TV detective work, Ren learns that the serial is in fact popular English professor and failed writer, Joe Carroll. Also through the discovery, Ren is almost killed and Joe Carroll is sent to prison. Super long story short, Carroll—with a lot of help—breaks out of prison, and serial killing terror begins to reign over the U.S.

Shonda Rhimes has nothing on the writers on this show. Never in my life have I actively been nervous and a little scared to watch a TV show. Not even that crazy clown on American Horror Story disturbs me like The Following does. Allow me to channel my inner Stefon and say this show has everything! Love, murder, action, mind tricks, Kevin Bacon, and excellent fitted jeans, hot British guys, adorable man ice. What’s adorable man ice? It's that thing where Shawn Ashmore, Iceman from X-Men:Days of Future Past, makes you feel all the feelings. This show will have you distrusting everyone and full of anxiety. In fact, I may have had an anxiety attack watching this! In all seriousness, The Following is the most suspenseful show on FOX and on TV.

Episode after episode, I watched Ren put clues together, and episode after episode, I was genuinely shocked at what I saw and what would come next. Unlike most shows where you learn its formula and eventually stop watching - I’M LOOKING AT YOU SCANDAL - this show will have you guessing and thinking well after you finish it. Just give it a chance, you guys. Go watch the first episode and then tell me what you think in a week. I say a week because you get hooked, call in from work, and binge watch this show. Kevin Bacon has never given us a real reason to distrust him; look how he convinced an entire town dancing was the answer. Oh, and at no point during the show does Kevin Bacon shout “LET’S DANCE” while chunks of glitter fly in a old building on the other side of the tracks in a red velvet tux. Sorry. - Rachel Hall

What We're Loving: Fake Letters, Bad Movies, Best Friends, Japanese Climax

Each Friday, DCH performers, teachers, and students offer their recommendations for what to watch, read, see, hear, or experience. This week David Allison hopes to cure his loneliness, Amanda Hahn suggests a visit to the bad part of town, Jonda Robinson doesn't leave her house, and Ryan Callahan is exited for climax.  jpegBooks are the worst. In the fight between sitting down to read a book and going to a cool party, going to a cool party is usually the winner. In fact, going to a cool party is like the Mike Tyson of the category. Sadly, Mike Tyson aged and doesn’t have it in him to battle off sitting down to read a book. And thus, the thing I’m loving this week, is a book. Gross.

My pick comes from one of my favorites, Jon Glaser. Even if you don’t remember his name, you’ve most likely seen Glaser as a writer/walk on artist on Conan O’Brien in the 90s, the recurring character Councilman Jamm on Parks & Recreation, or the brilliant show Delocated. Oh, and let’s not forget about that time he got justifiably mad at Pete Holmes. Regardless of what you know him as, you should be aware of his talents as an author.

My Dead Dad Was In ZZ Top is a collection of short, fictitious letters written by Glaser. The concept of the titular story is that a son cleans out the possessions of his recently deceased father and discovers a number of letters written from the dad to the members of ZZ Top, before they were famous. Beyond that fantastic piece, you can look forward to hearing about Van Halen’s alternate band names, Prince’s set list from the bat mitzvah of Steven Spielberg's daughter, and lyrics from when David Bowie sold out and started parodying his own songs. You can actually find a recording of Glaser singing the Bowie song on an episode of the Fogelnest Files if you want to click this link and jump to the 19:53 mark.

So please check out this book so that I can have someone to talk to about the one book per year I read. - David Allison

MV5BMTcxMDkxNTMwNl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMzc5MjUzNA@@._V1_SX640_SY720_The recent announcement that writer/producer/director/star of The Room, Tommy Wiseau, is coming out with a new sitcom reminded me of all the “so bad, they’re good” movies I watched or planned on watching after seeing and becoming obsessed with The Room. One of those movies was the gorgeously titled Hobo with a Shotgun. It was inspired by the intentionally over the top, silly, fake trailer that appeared in Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino’s Grindhouse. The joke probably should have ended there. But I’m glad it didn’t. Keep in mind, it’s not a good movie (which is partly intentional), but it’s entertaining if you watch it knowing this. It starts out with a hobo moving to a new town where most people have completely lost their moral compass. To establish this, one of the first things we see in the movie is the wealthy womanizer that runs the city decapitating his brother, followed by an unknown female in a bikini gyrating over the blood squirting out of his neck. And in case you don’t understand yet that this is a town filled with scum, to really drive the point home, this town is called Scum Town. It’s unclear why any of the citizens that are horrified and run away screaming from these acts of scum still live in Scum Town, but I suppose all of us make strange choices in life.

For a while, the hobo just wanders around Scum Town, watching these acts happen. But then one of the kids in the town, played by Greg from Zenon Girl of the 21st Century, shoves another kid’s face into a literal PILE of cocaine and tries to kill a prostitute. Then Hobo begins his vigilante lifestyle, beating Greg from Zenon with a sock of coins. After becoming BFF with the prostitute, he buys a shotgun to stop a robbery/baby murder, and so begins Hobo’s killing/corny line rampage.

Overall, this movie is filled with graphic killings, people getting their dicks shot off, pedophile Santa Clauses, doctor-killing robot ninjas, groan-worthy lines, and dramatic speeches that include the title of the movie. If you’re in the mood for something cheesy, heavy handed, and downright cartoonish, ain’t nothing better than our dear friend: Hobo with a Shotgun, available on Netflix. - Amanda Hahn

playinghouse_btsinterviews_600x500Some days are just made for binge watching TV. I had one of those days this week, and at the recommendation of a friend I spent it immersing myself in the USA show Playing House. The show was created by and stars Jessica St. Clair and Lennon Parham (both from the Upright Citizens Brigade) playing two best friends at very different life stages--Emma (St. Clair) is a single, 30-something business woman who moved away as soon as she could, while Maggie (Parham) is a married, soon-to-be mom who never left their hometown. When it’s discovered that Maggie’s husband is cheating on her, Emma decides to support her friend by moving home to help her raise the baby.

I love these characters and this set-up because the dynamic reminds me of myself and my longtime BFF, and also because, if needed, I would totally raise a child with her. The other characters who populate the show are fantastic as well, with Jane Kaczmarek as Emma’s estranged mother, Zach Woods as Maggie’s brother, and Keegan-Michael Key as my favorite character, Mark, the local cop and former flame of Emma. (I could probably write this whole post about how much I like Mark, and all my favorite Mark moments, but I won’t, I’ll just say he’s cute and great and dependable and helpful and charming and I hope someday to find my own version of him, blah, blah, etc., etc., you get the picture.) A slew of great guests show up along the way, as well.

The show hasn’t been picked up for a second season yet, but my fingers are crossed, because there are things I need to know. If you’re reading this, anyone with any pull at the USA Network, hear my cry: PLEASE DON’T LEAVE ME HANGING! - Jonda Robinson

show_match_icon.phpIt's that time of year again. The G1 Climax is here! For those of you who are unfamiliar, which I assume is all of you, the G1 Climax is an annual professional wrestling  tournament held by New Japan Pro Wrestling. Yes, it is pro wrestling, but it's in JAPAN. Yes, it's still pre-determined, but you wouldn't know by watching the matches. Unlike the American style, which carries an air of "Trust us, this is all pretend," Japanese wrestling is all about believability. Fighting men, each with his own style, each with his own persona, go to war over the course of two weeks to determine who has the most "fighting spirit." The G1 Climax is the closest thing we'll ever get to the Kumite.

The G1 has produced so many memorable matches over there years. The Vader-Keiji Muto semifinal match from the inaugural tournament in 1991 had the crowd in Sumo Hall so excited that they showered the ring with pillows in celebration. The 1998 match between Genichiro Tenryu and Shinya Hashimoto is the gold standard for lumpy guys beating the piss out of each other. Last year's tournament featured my favorite match of the year, a slugfest between my personal favorite wrestler Katsuyori Shibata, whose gimmick is that he kicks people wicked hard, and Tomohiro Ishii, a bowling ball of a man who takes, and sells absurd punishment, and just keeps firing back.

This year's G1 is the biggest ever, with 22 wrestlers competing, including such people you may know, like A.J. Styles, Doc Gallows (formally Luke Gallows of CM Punk's Straight Society), Shelton Benjamin, and Davey Boy Smith, Jr., and people you should know, like Hiroshi Tanahasi (best wrestler in the world), Kazuchika Okada, AKA The Rainmaker (on his way to becoming the best wrestler in the world), the aforementioned Shibata and Ishii, and Minoru Suzuki, the surly former shooter who once wrestled a mechanical mummy.

I spent a week last August holed up in my brother's basement watching the G1. I plan to do the same this year from the comfort of my own couch, starting tonight. If you are a current or lapsed fan of pro wrestling, I highly recommend. The commentary is in Japanese, but the characters are so clear and the action so entertaining that you'll have no problem following. Every show is available on UStream. - Ryan Callahan

 

What We're Loving: Returning Shows, Food in New Places, The Joys of Womanhood, The Dickens of Detroit

Each Friday, DCH performers, teachers, and students offer their recommendations for what to watch, read, see, hear, or experience. This week David Allison makes bold predictions, Ashley Bright admits her bias, Julia Cotton feels like a natural woman, and Ryan Callahan works on his greatest goal in life. vibe-new-orange-is-the-new-black-season-2-shots

Time is crazy y’all! I am writing this in a world where season two of Orange is the New Black has not been released. But, dear friend, you are currently reading this article in a world where season two of Orange is the New Black is available on Netflix. Like right now! Currently, I’m watching another episode of it as you take in our picks for the week, but I already know everything that’s going to happen this season. How? Past tv tropes. Shows tend to follow patterns, so it’s easy to hazard a few guesses. Maybe ten? Yeah, I’ll go with ten. Here are ten things that will happen this season on Orange is the New Black:

1) New friends will be introduced, probably with an inspirational speech, a loud argument or intimidating silence. 2) We will learn more about old friends. Don’t worry, their past transgression(s) will be justified. 3) A character that was once trusted will no longer be able to be trusted 4) Said characters breach of trust will be explained in an intimate conversation, probably at the edge of a bed, a stroll in the yard, or in an arbitrary church. 5) People will totally do it. Like, woah, doin’ it. 6) Someone will attempt to murder someone else, a move that will change EVERYTHING 7) The murderee will survive, thus negating the potential change and keeping things as they were. 8) The recovery of the murderee will be slow at first and then within a week, he/she will back to 100%. 9) I will participate in about fifteen conversations with people who watch the show, the thesis of each will be “Yeah, that security guard is played by Lauren Lapkus, she’s a really great improviser, they should use her more.” 10) Prison will continue to take some getting used to.

Orange is the New Black is a consistently fun show to watch, even if it is a bit formulaic. So hurry up and finish reading what the lovely ladies, and lovely Ryan, are recommending this week so we can talk about this show over the weekend. - David Allison

595e5a2f-c809-48bc-9441-bf1680134724_800I may be biased because I'm a Tony Bourdain fan, (See? I called him Tony instead of Anthony. Fanship confirmed.) but I've really been enjoying his CNN show Parts Unknown, which you can find on Netflix. If you've watched his No Reservations then you pretty much know what to expect because Parts Unknown is not much different. It's Tony hanging out with people, eating food, and exploring cool places. He's going to a bit more dangerous places like Libya, the Congo, or Jerusalem. In the Libya episode, he visits the ruins of Qaddafi's palace and the danger was palpable. The rebels running that area were not fans of Westerners scooting around with video cameras. But even among the danger, he is graciously welcomed to share a meal. In Myanmar, he talks with people who openly share their feelings on the state of their nation; people who had spent many years in prison for talking about their government. He goes to the Gaza Strip and eats with both Jewish folk and Palestinians. He eats at a restaurant run by a Jewish woman and her Palestinian husband. She is the only Jewish person in her community. Amid the tension and seemingly unsolvable issues, people are just people. They just want to be happy, let their kids be happy, and be free to travel to whatever territory they want.

One of my favorite scenes was while he was eating with a table of elderly ex-pats who had been living in Tangier since the 50s and 60s, when beatniks, writers, musicians, and artists flocked to the city. He asked them, "who at this table smokes hashish?" and most, if not all, of them raised their hands. You have to see it to really appreciate it, but it was a table of Judy Dench and Ian McKellan lookalikes. I just found it cute that they all raised their hand to that question. But to be fair, I bet both Judy Dench and Sir Ian McKellan probably throw down on some hashish themselves.

This show is great for learning about history, culture, and even current events. But the thing I most enjoy is just watching human beings be human beings. Most of us are prettydamn cool. - Ashley Bright

A lady never kisses and tells.  But, a real woman forsakes being a lady in the name of good comedic storytelling ...and sisterhood.

9780810989023_p0_v1_s260x420Growing up a “lady” in a fairly conservative household, conversations of dealing with the opposite sex were very limited.  Many of my friends grew up the same way, so we seldom even talked about boys amongst each other.  This left us to fend for ourselves, rather ill equipped, into the wild of men that inhabit the world outside of our shielded upbringings.  Needless to say, we each have had some horror stories dealing with the men types… stories that none of us would ever tell each other, until I listened to this one interview with Allison Brie.  I forget which one...maybe a Nerdist podcast??  They were going on about how Brie often plays characters that seem so wholesome and refined (see Community and Mad Men), but then they came across a rather graphic tale that she contributed to the book Worst Laid Plans about a very awkward sexual experience.

Worst Laid Plans began as a comedy show performed at UCB L.A.  Women would do stage readings of sexual-encounters-gone-wrong, all of which are hilarious and terrifyingly relatable.  Guests have included the great Amy Poehler, Janeane Garofalo, Laraine Newman, and many other comedic writers/performers.  A few of these monologues have been published in book form.

Brie scoffed at the idea that she would a)not be capable of having a weird sexual experience and b)not be willing to tell about it.  After all, we tell stories so that we are able to relate to one another.  Why should stories of this nature be any different? Because we are ladies?

Listening to this audiobook made this lady feel more like a natural woman than I ever had before.  My friends and I have become much closer having shared delightfully awful casual hook-up stories of our own.  We bellow over in laughter not only at the tragic tales, but also understanding that many of them may have been avoided if we’d just been talking about it all along. - Julia Cotton 

Elmore LeonardElmore Leonard wrote over 40 novels in his lifetime and I’ve made it a goal in life to read every one. Each year I knock out two or three. Last week I finished Maximum Bob, his early 90’s novel about a human peacock in a judge’s robe and the oddballs, misfits, criminals and crime fighters he sends careening into each other like billiards balls with a few and arrogant and selfish decisions. Right now I’m reading LaBrava, his 1980 novel about a Secret Service agent turned photographer and the oddballs, misfits, and criminals who careen around him like billiards balls after one selfish and arrogant decision.

You might notice that Leonard’s novels have a certain formula to them. In addition to the plots, which are often so similar, you can count on a certain set of stock characters. There's the pair of mismatched lowlifes planning a crime, in over their heads and hating each other. The drugged out rich boy, usually confined to a house, who begins as a benefactor to the lowlifes and eventually becomes their target. There will be a young blonde who plays with men like G.I. Joes or an older brunette who’s struggling to earn respect in the male-dominated world of law enforcement. And there will be a charming, laconic, graying at the temples dud, sometimes a cop, sometimes a crook, who romances the heroine, knocks around the lowlifes and gets what he wants in the end. The ending will feel abrupt and end with a joke. And the whole thing will be so damn much fun that you’ll want to pick up another book right away.

Leonard wrote with a grace and clarity that you will not find anywhere else. He believed in leaving out the parts that readers tend to skip. His books are marvels of precision. He moved his stories along so fast, and moves in and out of all the different point of views so well, that it feels like you watched a movie in your head.

With so many books, knowing where to start can be overwhelming. My top two favorites are Swag, the story of a used car salesman and a car thief who team up to making a killing in the armed robbery business, or The Hot Kid, Leonard’s late-career masterpiece about a U.S. Marshall in the 1930’s. After that try something gritty, like Killshot, or witty, like Get Shorty. Really, you can’t go wrong with any of them. Just start reading. And let me know what you think. - Ryan Callahan

What We're Loving: Comedy Canons, Televison History, Self-Loathing Doctors, Classical Open Mics

image (3)Each Friday, DCH performers, teachers, and students offer their recommendations for what to watch, read, see, hear, or experience. This week David Allison laughs in his cubicle, Ashley Bright runs for her notepad, Ryan Callahan sees a reflection of himself, and Amanda Hahn finds hidden treasure. Time_Bobby

It’s the best week of the year!  If you’re asking why, then you’re most likely not familiar with Comedy Bang Bang’s yearly triumph known as “Time Bobby.” AND THAT MAKES YOU DUMB.  Comedy Bang Bang is a free weekly podcast on which host Scott Aukerman invites guests both real and fake to join him in conversation.  Each installment of the show is different,  save for some recurring characters and, occasionally, recurring episodes.  Monday, May 12th saw the release of the third “Time Bobby,” a fan favorite episode which pits a Bobby Moynihan voiced orphan child named Fourvel (One less than Fievel) against Paul F. Tompkins’ Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber.  PFT appears often on Comedy Bang Bang because of his quick wit, character range, and phenomenal rapport with Aukerman.  But even though we get to enjoy about fifteen appearances a year of Tompkins on the broadcast, he’s always at his best when he’s paired with Saturday Night Live’s Bobby Moynihan.  Most of the time that PFT joins in on an episode, he and Aukerman are against each other, so it’s a blast to listen to them band together against the Moynihan’s orphan boy.

I’d recommend taking a listen if you enjoy any of the following:

  • Mnemonic Devices
  • Knives
  • STARLIGHT EXPRESS (Note: I bought a sweet Starlight Express poster this week.  Jealous?)
  • Holding back laughter as you listen to podcasts in cubicles

Please remember that there have been previous episodes of “Time Bobby,” so if you’ve been unaware of the franchise until today, YOU HAVEN’T EARNED THE RIGHT TO LISTEN TO EPISODE THREE, SO DON’T ACT LIKE YOU CAN JUST WALTZ INTO YOUR PODCAST APP AND LISTEN TO THE LATEST ITERATION LIKE YOU OWN THE PLACE.  You need to be aware of canon.  The original was released on 3/26/12 (Episode 150), followed by the second on 4/22/13 (Episode 215).  Also, there was an appearance of both characters on season two of the Comedy Bang Bang television show, but Fourvel and Andrew Lloyd Webber were not on the same episode so THE TV SHOW IS NOT CANON.  Listen to them all and you’ll know what to do the next time you’re with a group of people and someone yells K.N.I.F.E. G.R.A.B.! - David Allison

urlThis week I watched America in Primetime on Netflix, a four-part documentary that originally aired on PBS.  The show is broken up into four episodes based on different character archetypes of television: "Man of the House," "Independent Woman," "The Misfit,"and "The Crusader."  Show creators, writers, and actors are interviewed, and most have the opinion that television is the greatest medium because the audience truly gets to connect with the character. (Except for David Chase, who created The Sopranos, who has a particularly sassy and refreshing opinion that 2 hours is plenty of time to get to know a character.)

In the first episode, "Man of the House," Norman Lear, the creator of All in the Family, said something that made me hit pause and run for my notepad: "I take life seriously.  I see the comedy in it.  I see the foolishness of the human condition.  I delight in it and I've used it."  Full disclosure: I ran for my notebook because the closed captioning said "abused" and I loved that, but after reviewing the tape, he definitely says "used."  I still love the quote enough to tell you about it, but I may not have ran so quickly for "used."  Each writer and creator has a similar sort of take on their creation.  They were writing human beings, fully dimensional human beings.  Carl Reiner talks about unintentionally pushing boundaries with The Dick Van Dyke Show because he wrote a character who actually respected his wife.

I'm going to presume that if you reading this on the DCH website that you have some interest in comedy as an art form.  If so, I recommend watching this series.  It's a real peak inside the minds of some of the greatest storytellers of the last 50 years.  It's a testimonial to the fact that character is more important than plot, which you may have heard from time to time in your comedy journey.  Note: DO NOT watch "The Crusader" episode, if you haven't yet watched The Wire.  David Simon lays down some beautiful truth bombs, but there are spoilers galore. - Ashley Bright

house-md-1024x768Recently I resumed an old, bad habit from my college days: falling asleep to TV shows. Instead of reading a book, or letting the stillness of the night watch over me, I've been drowning out my constant inner monologue with the scripted television's aggressive noise. After burning through the first season of Brooklyn 99 and catching up on Parks and Rec and Community, I needed something new to sooth my soul, something comfortable, something familiar, something like House, MD.  I've always been a huge fan of procedurals. They satisfy my inherent need for structure and closure. I loved the show when it first began, ten years ago, but stopped watching somewhere around season four, either because life got in the way or the show's formula (House gets it wrong three times before discovering a secret the patient has kept from him and nailing the diagnosis on the fourth try) grew stale.

Having never watched the final seasons, and wondering how it all ended, I decided to pick the show back up. Naturally, because I have a terrible fear of not knowing things, I started from season one. It's been ten years since I've watched these episodes, ten eventful years in my life. House is still a compelling show, (in fact, so compelling that's costing me sleep. I can always watch one more episode) but compelling for different reasons. When I first watched, I thought House was the coolest character on TV, a total bad ass, the smartest guy in the room playing by his own rules, destroying people with withering  sarcasm while getting high the whole time. Now I see the sadness. The way he pushes people away. The way his selfish actions harm the people who love him most. The way he takes out his self-loathing on everyone who comes into his orbit. Where once I saw so much comedy, now I see tragedy. And I see an accurate portrayal of an addict. The sarcasm is still funny, thanks to Hugh Laurie's delivery and timing. There are times when I see him cut someone down, or deflect a question with a joke and I think, "I should act more like that." Then I remember I did act like that. And it was really lonely. - Ryan Callahan

 

dariusOn Tuesday night, I needed to find a place to work. With my eyelids getting heavier by the minute and my bed seeming closer and closer by the second, I knew staying home was hazardous to my productivity. Around 10:00 pm, I decided to head to BuzzBrews Kitchen on Lemmon Avenue. I was hoping to find friendly waiters, endless coffee, and plenty of room to spread out my work. What I found was even better. I found live classical music – totally free. Initially, when I entered BuzzBrews, the first thing I noticed was that it was surprisingly crowded. The second thing I noticed was that it wasn’t filled with college students studying for finals. This was an older crowd of people in their late thirties and early forties. Almost everyone was drinking wine. Many men were wearing sport coats and fedoras. There wasn’t a textbook or computer in sight. The third thing I noticed was that the music playing in the restaurant was very pleasant. Quickly after this realization, I noticed the fourth and most important thing: the beautiful piano piece I was listening to wasn’t a recording. It was live. I didn’t know this before, but every Tuesday night from 8:00 pm until 12:00 am, BuzzBrews hosts an open mic for classical musicians. I’m so happy that I found this that I’m downright angry that I didn’t know about this sooner. The casual atmosphere with a touch of class was exactly what I needed to focus on work but still be relaxed. The music throughout the night ranged from a cappella singers to fiddlers to pianists. Some acts were mediocre, but others were fantastic. These hidden talents of Dallas kept my head bobbing, toes tapping, and heart tranquil as I pounded out all the work I needed to finish. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MncemQbYPpQ I know where I’ll start going every Tuesday night. But from now on, I hope to be accompanied by a glass of wine and a few friends, not my computer. - Amanda Hahn

What We're Loving: Life Experience, Cooked Hamm Sandwich, Illiterate Hollywood

photo (1)Each Friday, DCH performers, teachers, and students offer their recommendations for what to watch, read, see, hear, or experience. This week David Allison finds a new favorite tv show, Ashley Bright might be the real Don Draper, and Ryan Callahan pays a visit to 1980's Hollywood.

imgresLook, I am well aware that Andy Daly has been talked about before on this website, specifically here and here. With that said, his new show Review is my favorite thing on television right now and you need to know to check it out.  The program is a stateside interpretation of an Australian show where a host, Forrest MacNeil (Daly), reviews and rates life experiences like doing cocaine, going to prom, and being Batman.  Each episode opens with the quote “Life, it’s literally all we have, but is it any good?” which is a perfect summation of what to expect.

The show is four episodes in and, unlike most shows of this type, each episode builds on the previous  Thus far, the peak has come in week three. The episode begins with his review of eating fifteen pancakes, a task he previously found unimaginable as he’s “never eaten more than two pancakes in a month.”  The way the episode heightens his pain in the next two reviews is beautiful and I refuse to spoil any of it.  Review can be seen on Thursdays at 9 pm cst on Comedy Central or you can just come over and we’ll watch it together. Either way works for me, I just want to make sure you check out this show. - David Allison

mad-men-season-6-jon-hamm-2I'll admit it: I'm partial to Jon Hamm. His appearances during the live 30 Rock episodes were some of my favorite moments of the show. And if I can personally relate to any fictional character, it's Don Draper. You may be thinking to yourself, "Geez Ashley, you must think you're quite the cool customer." I do, but I also relate to his less cool (i.e. slightly crazy) emotional complexities. Also, we learned in the "Zu Bi Zu Bi Zu" episode that Don's birthday is June 1 - so is mine! I've gotten off topic trying to convince you that I'm as cool as Don Draper. This week I watched A Young Doctor's Notebook starring Jon Hamm and Daniel Radcliffe. I've only watched the four episodes available on Netflix, but it was such an intriguing 80 minute nugget that I can't wait to watch the rest. So far, two seasons of four episodes each have aired on BBC. The show is cringingly amusing. I literally cringed and covered my eyes while watching it. But I also laughed. It's dark and different and recommend giving it a watch. And not just because I'm partial to Jon Hamm. - Ashley Bright

jon-peters-book-0905-03Stories of behind-the-scenes drama and the clash of creative egos have always appealed to me. Over the past few years, books like Difficult Men, Pictures at a Revolution, and Marvel: The Untold Story earned a spot on my nightstand with their gossipy takes on artists and wannabe-artists behaving badly, boldly, and blindly. Hit and Run by Nancy Griffin and Kim Masters, which I read this week, tells the story of Sony's disastrous foray into the movie business. But that's not why I'm writing about it. I'm writing about it because it contains a treasure trove of the best kind of Hollywood stories: Jon Peters stories. Jon Peters stories are the best. For those who don't know, Peters, pictured at left carrying his business partner Peter Guber, is a famous Hollywood rags to riches story. A high school drop-out turned hairdresser, Peters became, thanks to then girlfriend Barbra Streisand, a producer on the remake of A Star is Born. Peters used Streisand's clout and his own brand of personal intensity to make the movie about his love affair with Streisand. It was a six million dollar home movie. And it was a hit. From there, Peters was off and running, using his relationships, his force of will, and his fearsome temper, to become one of the richest and most powerful producers in Hollywood, despite being largely illiterate.

Today, Peters is remembered, if he's remembered at all, as the man who wanted to make a Superman movie where Superman didn't fly, didn't wear his costume, and fought a giant mechanical spider. But in his day, Jon Peters was the 800 pound gorilla. Nobody did it bigger, costlier, or crazier. Hit and Run is full of Jon Peters stories: Jon Peters wooing Swedish supermodel Vendela by sending her a private jet full of flowers. Jon Peters visiting the set of Rain Main and asking Dustin Hoffman whether he played, "the retard or the other guy." Jon Peters breaking the jaw of a marketing executive and then hiding under a desk when the cops came. They don't make them like Jon Peters anymore, nor should they. Hollywood is, was, and will always be, the real Land of Misfit Toys. For a while, Jon Peters was the greatest misfit of all. I'm thankful that a man like him exists, and that I never have to meet him. - Ryan Callahan