Tori Oman

Troupe Talk: Franzia

Franzia Today is a big day. It’s a day when stereotypes break free from their mold. It’s a day when something usually thought of as nothing more than a cheap mind number for boozy lushes gets to step up as something bigger. Today is a day when we can raise our glasses, fill it with a generous helping of our favorite boxed wine, and know that that wine has a bigger purpose. Because today is the day that Troupe Talk talks to Franzia, one of DCH’s very own funny foursomes (individual people that make up a group of four...not boxed wine induced foursomes...at least not most of the time).

Tell us all the reasons you are like a fine, box of Franzia wine.

With us, you get a lot of bang for your buck.

Franzia, the box of wine, is tag lined as the “the world’s most popular wine.” What would Franzia, the improv troupe, be tag lined with?

“So so good, so so cheap.”

What makes Franzia unique or different from other improv troupes?

We rely on feeling rather than format. When it “feels like it’s time,” we start the call back crescendo.

Tell us about your most memorable Franzia scene or show.

In the Chicago Improv Festival, we had an amazing show. We had a funeral scene for a horse that was very effective. According to Tommy, the horse had helped him quit smoking. After the show, some Chi-folk said, “If that’s what you guys are doing in Dallas, keep it up.” We felt proud.

Raise your pantomimed improv glass of Franzia and make a toast to each other.

Singing loudly, “Nobody does it beetterrrr, makes me feel sad for the reeeest. Nobody does it haaalf as good as you….baby, you’re the beeeeeessttt.”

Franzia performs at the Dallas Comedy House on October 3 and October 24.

Tori Oman is a Dallas Comedy House graduate.

Troupe Talk: Small Town

Small Town Not sure if you heard friends, but LOVE is in the air at the Dallas Comedy House (DCH). And not just the love between that drunken couple that caught a show on Saturday for their Tinder date, but the “for reals” kind, where like, you get married and stuff. DCH improv veterans, instructors, and Small Town troupe teammates Kyle Austin and Maggie-Rieth-but now she’s-Austin tied the knot this past month! So go ahead, start ooooo’ing and awwww’ing and sink your teeth into this week’s edition of Troupe Talk: The Love Story Edition.

You guys just got married! Congratulations! What’s being married to your improv scene partner like?

Maggie: It's the best. We haven't technically performed together since we got married, but I have really high hopes for it. Or it could be a miserable disaster, and we will both quit improv. Tomato, to-mah-to. Kyle: I don't know what it's like to be married to my scene partner, yet...but come out this Saturday and find out the same time I do.

What rules of improv are also good rules for relationships?

Maggie: All of them. Mostly, "You look good if you make your partner look good." I don't want to be in a relationship - or improv troupe - that's about cutting one another down or competing. I want to build this thing together! Kyle: Good improv/relationship rules: - listening - give-and-take - compassion for the other person's decisions/choices....even if they are silly

How long have you both been doing improv, and how long have you been improving together?

Maggie: I started taking classes in the fall 2011. I think Kyle and I have been performing together for a little over a year or so ... unless you count the performance of dating, which we've been doing for the last three-and-a-half years. Kyle: I have been improvising for 10-plus years now, and together we've been doing it since I moved my stuff into her house while she was at work. So a little over a year...

Give us the similarities between a wedding and an improv show.

Maggie: All eyes are on you, and afterwards everyone wants to talk to you about how great it is. Or, people avoid eye contact and just want to get drinks at the bar. Kyle: Similarities between an improv show/wedding: - Lots of agreeing with last second changes - The people there are (for the most part) there to support you - Everyone is watching

When does Kyle/Maggie make you laugh the most?

Maggie: Kyle gets this weird, mischievous look on his face every once in a while and then does something ridiculous and weird: like some strange musical dance number. I always laugh at that. Kyle: Maggie makes me laugh the hardest when she thinks she's right, but then finds out she's wrong...it's like a huge revelation!

Small Town perform at the Dallas Comedy House on August 29, September 12, October 17, and October 30.

Tori Oman is a Level Five student at DCH. She’s trained and performed with the Second City and iO in L.A. and Chicago. Favorite pastimes include being irrationally competitive at Monopoly, eating an apple in every country she’s traveled to, and being the sole person on this planet that thinks Necco Wafers are a delicious candy choice.

Troupe Talk: Primary Colours

Primary Colours Fun fact for you from the Primary Colours interview editing “room”:

I’m editing this interview from the airport at the bar (because airports are for beer) drinking an IPA (because airports are for beer), and eating edamame. Edamame (for those that don’t know) is green. (…And airports are for beer.)

Interesting fact I learned interviewing Primary Colours about green: Yellow, red, and blue are the primary colors. And green. Because something about light.

Second fun fact for you from the Primary Colours interview editing “room”: I’m headed to my (unofficial) sweet home Chicago.

Interesting fact that relates to that, that I learned by interviewing Primary Colours: They are headed to Pittsburgh (soon) for the Pittsburgh Comedy Festival! And Ashley’s Grandma will be there!

Fun fact for you from the Primary Colours interview editing “room”: There is a really sweet looking Grandma sitting at a table nearby at the TGI Fridays

Totally unrelated fact that sort of has to do with my interview with Primary Colours: I really hope that is Ashley’s Grandma so I can rub it in all of their faces that I met her (and fed her a pierogi) first.

Friends, I happily present to you: Primary Colours!

Congrats on your acceptance to the Pittsburgh Comedy Festival! What are you most stoked about?

Ash: I'm stoked about us all [except Rob :(]  being on the same plane. Those poor other passengers. Also stoked about pierogies. And wedding soup. And hanging out with my grandma.

Tim: I’m stoked about meeting Ashley’s grandma and hand-feeding her a pierogi. I don’t want to get ahead of myself, but I’ve read Pittsburgh is a pretty romantic city, so we’ll see what develops.

Sarah: I’m stoked about meeting Ashley’s grandma and holding her hand while gazing at the merging of the rivers. And going balls out with some of my best friends. And finally finding out what exactly Jerrell’s morning beauty routine is.

Jerrell: Thank you! I’m stoked about meeting Ashley’s grandma, all the food, and the actual plane ride. I loveeee plane rides. Or like, just the idea of plane rides. They make me feel accomplished.

Lindsay: I'm stoked about meeting Ashley's grandma and taking her to the observatory to gaze at the stars. And having a break from mom responsibilities. Unless someone needs a mom...

Rob: I’ve met one of Ashley’s grandma’s before, it was lovely. She snickered at dirty jokes. I’ve also heard that Pittsburgh is a city of romance, bridges, and silent H’s, so hopefully we’ll all get some of that. Sarah has a silent H, so that’s a neat coincidence.

Colten: I’m stoked about flying back all together with Ashley’s grandma. I love plane rides and grandmas.

Tell us about the form Primary Colours follows. What’s your style?

Ash: Form - the Harold. Style - Shenanigans.

Tim: I think Ashley said it all. However, I always think of our style as being pretty esoteric, as in, only really funny to us. I’m always a bit confused when people laugh at our shows, because I typically don’t expect people to find our ridiculous shit funny.

Sarah: I think Ashley and Tim said it all. Plus a lot of singing.

Lindsay: I think Ashley, Tim, and Sarah said it all. Plus a ton of support, no matter how crazy it gets.

Jerrell: It’s all been said, plus a lot of smiling and fart noises.

Rob: I think it’s all been covered except my favorite part of the show, which is when someone who’s never seen improv before leans over to the friend who brought them and says, “What’s happening?” loud enough for me to hear.

Colten: I think Harold had the best answer. He covered it all. It’s a Harold, that’s what we do. This is our style.

In Pittsburgh you’ll probably run into improvisers from other cities. What would you tell them is unique about the Dallas Comedy House?

Ash: I'd ask them if they've ever played hangers, but then I'd remember it no longer exists, so I'd mumble something about Tommy and tacos and amble away.

Tim: I’d tell them it’s an incredibly supportive and welcoming community, especially now that I’ve left.

Sarah: Ditto what Tim said. And we should bring back hangers.

Lindsay: I'll tell them that I still feel left out, because I never got to play hangers.

Jerrell: I would tell them all about hangers because it went off. And yeah, just how supportive our community is. It’s wonderful.

Rob: I’d probably corner Aubrey Plaza and spit some mad game for our coach, Tyler Via. I’m actually not going to Pittsburgh, but I can imagine it going something like this, “Hey, **head nod**” She’ll get the picture.

Colten: I’m going to make Tyler Via and Aubrey Plaza play hangers together, so he can explain to her that it was invented in Dallas.

Name something you love that’s the color of each of the three primary colors.

Ash: Well, PC East member Andre lectured us many times that green is a primary color of light (along with red and blue) and that red, yellow, and blue are primary colors of pigment. So, I just go with an overlapping four. But to answer your question: Blue - a nice, semi-cloudy night sky. Yellow - candied ginger. Red - a big, raw cut ruby I saw once and haven't forgotten. Green - dank memes.

Tim: Possibly the smartest, funniest person I’ve ever met pointed out that green is only a primary color in terms of light, and that pigment is different. So, I just want to be clear where I’m coming from and that I’m choosing the colors of fragmented light. But, to get to the point - blue - Amanda Austin’s eye shadow. Red - a scratch from a lil kitty cat. Green - dank memes.

Sarah: Dre-dre all day. Blue - a dark, blue suit that my dude wears that makes him look hella fine; Ashley’s light blue eyes; red - my DCH intern shirt; yellow - that one yellow shirt that Tim wears that is pretty much sheer; green - the tip of this onion that I let just grow outside my apartment for a few months, it was pretty scary but fascinating.

Lindsay: Blue - The New England Patriots uniforms. Yellow - The leaves in the fall in New England. Red - My first car, a Jetta that I drove until it fell apart 200,000 miles later. Green - A four-leaf clover.

Jerrell: Blue - The color of the Lost season 1 DVD set. Yellow - Pikachu. Red - Taylor Swift’s album. Green - Flubber.

Rob: Hi Andre, I hope you read this. Blue - Obi-Wan Kenobi’s lightsaber blade hue. Yellow - A type of fever. Red - the “what makes the red man red?” song from Peter Pan. “Why don’t you ask him, Howe?” lolz OK sorry. Green - “The Color of Money.”

Colten: Blue - the ocean. Yellow - Starburst. Red - record buttons. Green - (this goes out to Andre) spearmint flavored gum packages.

Primary Colours performs Friday, August 28, at the Pittsburgh Comedy Festival and regularly at the Dallas Comedy House.

Tori Oman is a Level Five student at DCH. She’s trained and performed with the Second City and iO in L.A. and Chicago. Favorite pastimes include being irrationally competitive at Monopoly, eating an apple in every country she’s traveled to, and being the sole person on this planet that thinks Necco Wafers are a delicious candy choice.

Troupe Talk: Local Honey

Local Honey At Dallas Comedy House (DCH), we encourage our community to “Laugh Local." Something else we encourage is that, since you’re laughing local, you should probably laugh local at the lovely ladies of Local Honey. And something I personally encourage? Conducting interviews with said lovely ladies of Local Honey while they happen to be at a bachelorette party (and may or may not have just enjoyed an adult beverage). #bestinterviewofmylife

Ladies and gentlemen, the delightfully wonderful, Local Honey.

Name three Dallas local things that you love:

Christie: 1. Dallas Comedy House 2. Uncle Uber's 3. Tommy Lee Brown

Amanda: I like food. So I always like our local food. Also, our local chain restaurants. It's also fun to say, "Oh you don't have that in your city? Must only be in Dallas." Do I sound snobby? I hope so. Because I'm the least snobby about food. Except Doritos.

Nikki: 1.) The Perot 2.) Emporium Pies 3.) Dallas Comedy House

Describe the style of Local Honey's comedy.

Christie: It's an honest, in-depth look at female stereotypes and characters. Amanda: Fast and loose and chill and slow. We are predictably unpredictable. We also bring a lot of honesty to our shows. I like that a lot. Nikki: Our style is simple, we try to put on a universally funny show and we want to have a good time while doing it. There aren’t any gimmicks or theatrics, we just want to make people belly laugh when they watch our show.

What's your favorite thing about performing with these ladies?

Christie: We are all honestly best friends. That makes it so much easier. Amanda: How much we genuinely enjoy each other on and off stage. Regardless of what happens in a show, I know anyone who watches us would agree we have naturally good chemistry with each other. Also, we try to be cognizant of what's going on in the show and who is playing straight and who is playing absurd that night. And we support the fuck out of that. We all have our moments, and we're good at recognizing that with each other. I guess you'd call it women's intuition. Nikki: I love how we warm up. We sit around and complain about our ailments and kvetch about our lives. I, in particular, always have something wrong with me, and Christie and Amanda let me tell them all the gross details. It’s a safe place where we can let it all hang out and we never judge each other.

Most memorable Local Honey show?

Christie: When Nikki did a complete ribbon wand dance to "Fancy," sung by Amanda, acapella. Amanda: Oh gosh. I have the worst show memory. I usually say the last one. But I did really enjoy our last one. Everyone had such absurd moments. But I think the most memorable was the festival a few years ago. We were stuck in some alternate universe Underground Railroad (for soccer moms, or something, I don't know...my memory!) and it was just super fun. It's also after that show we realized Christie should be our third. Nikki: Honestly, there are so many, but I think our most memorable show was at the 2013 Dallas Comedy Festival. We did a scene where we were in an Underground Railroad for PTA refugees and it had all of the elements that make a funny, strange, memorable scene. We were working together in the scene as the characters and were working together as improvisors. It was a cool meld of reality and fantasy. I don’t think I will ever forget that show.

Last time you laughed really, really hard:

Christie: About 15 minutes ago. I was stuck in the middle of Lake Dallas on a one-person paddle board. I was drunk and so was everyone else around me. None of us could paddle back in to the dock. So we just hung out there until we stopped laughing. Amanda: With those girls? At every show. I'm super fortunate I get to play with two people better than me and that they put up with all my B.S. Nikki: The last time I laughed was this morning. I laugh a lot. Ask my improv students. :)

Name something that is definitely better with honey:

Christie: Comedy. And Brie cheese. Amanda: My dog, Honey. When I feed her honey, she's super chill. Nikki: I love putting honey on fried chicken. Great. Now I want to eat fried chicken.

Local Honey performs at the Dallas Comedy House on August 22.

Tori Oman is a Level Five student at DCH. She’s trained and performed with the Second City and iO in L.A. and Chicago. Favorite pastimes include being irrationally competitive at Monopoly, eating an apple in every country she’s traveled to, and being the sole person on this planet that thinks Necco Wafers are a delicious candy choice.

Troupe Talk: Age Appropriate

Age Appropriate Sometimes I wish that there were two universes you could step in and out of: one where, sure, fine, you have to behave age appropriate. I mean, everyone loves a little bit of stability and habit. You have to go to work, wash your socks, and pay the milkman for his delivery. But then there is another universe where work means WERK (AMMIRIGHT?), washing socks only happens if you are playing in a sweet, sweet rain storm, and you're paying the milkman, sure, but not for that kind of delivery. *wink*. (...Did that just get weird?)

Soooooo, unfortunately, this week's troupe talk doesn’t have two universes for you. (Or a milkman.) But what we do have is something better. We’ve got the two, solidly funny fellows from the two-man improv show, Age Appropriate. #youareeeeeewelcome

So go ahead, give us the cutesy, tootsy story of how you two met! How long have you been a thang?

Mike: Well, it's a fairly crazy story. Ben and I took classes together at the Dallas Comedy House (DCH). I think a couple months after finishing the program in 2012, we started practicing together for a two-person show. Like I said, a crazy story. Ben: Mike and I met in our Level 3 class at DCH. We went through the program and have been improvising together for almost four years. It is oddly similar to the movie Sleepless in Seattle, only it takes place in Dallas and we are both heavy sleepers.

Why do you like improvising with each other? (*awkwardly dances while hoping you actually do…*)

Mike: I love improvising with Ben, because I think we're different improvisers in some ways. We both have different strengths and weaknesses. For example, Ben does awesome stuff with environment and space work that I would just never think of. We're also just different people outside of improv with different interests and perspectives that we bring to our scenes. I just typed the word "different" four times. Ben: Without a doubt, improvising with Mike is one of my favorite activities in my week. He plays exceptional characters and makes really fun choices on stage that leads us to wonderful discoveries during a show. Truthfully, we are very different individuals, and without improv I very much doubt we would have met each other. Thanks to DCH I have a fantastic improv partner and friend I get to see and perform with every week.

What do you think makes a really good scene in improv?

Mike: Shouting, touching, going for a laugh at the expense of the scene, ignoring your partner, and references to pop culture. These are guaranteed to make for a really good improv scene. Ben: Even if you aren’t “following” the rules of improv in your scene, if you are having fun onstage, so is the audience.

What's the difference between playing in a group of two as opposed to say, six?

Mike: A lot. I think playing with just one other person is more challenging, but it can also be more rewarding in a way. It's just the two of you out there, so you know there's no one coming in to edit or walk on or tap out or whatever. I think a two-person show also forces you to just deal with what's in front of you a bit more than in a group. You can go for just the joke, but that scene is going to be over fast. You're kind of forced to deal with relationship to make the scene work, or it's just going to be a bad show. Ben: In Age Appropriate, I’m responsible for 50 percent of the show. In my mind, I am obligated and expected to do more in a two-person show because there is no cavalry coming to support the scene. With an ensemble, sometimes you can have a secondary role that evening because the show dictates it and your other players are the primary characters within the show. In a two-person show, that is never an option. All we have is each other when we walk on stage.

The world would be a better place if everyone followed the _____rule of improv.

Mike: "Slow down, listen, and have an honest reaction" rule. Ben: Make your partner look better than yourself. Generally, we live in a self-absorbed and a me-first society. If everyone looked out for each other and put others before themselves, without a doubt the world would be a more harmonious place (jumps off soapbox).

Please name three things that ARE age appropriate and three things that ARE NOT.

Mike:

Age appropriate: 1) A 34-year-old man drinking a beer 2) a 34-year-old man crying while watching It's a Wonderful Life 3) a 34-year-old man listening to Merle Haggard

NOT age appropriate: 1) a 34-year-old man drinking a glass of milk 2) a 34-year-old man watching any cartoons 3) a 34-year-old man listening to any teenager sing

Ben:

Age appropriate: 1) Ron Howard 2) M&M’s 3) Bob Saget, pre 1995

NOT age appropriate: 1) Ron Jeremy 2) Eminem 3) Bob Saget, post 1995

Age Appropriate performs at the Dallas Comedy House on August 14

Tori Oman is a Level Five student at DCH. She’s trained and performed with the Second City and iO in L.A. and Chicago. Favorite pastimes include being irrationally competitive at Monopoly, eating an apple in every country she’s traveled to, and being the sole person on this planet that thinks Necco Wafers are a delicious candy choice.

Troupe Talk: Law & Order: The SVUsical

Law and Order "In the Criminal Justice System, the people are represented by two separate, yet equally important groups. The police who investigate crime and the District Attorneys who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories."

….those are the opening lines for Law and Order SVU (you know, the TV show).

"At the Dallas Comedy House, the Criminal Justice System is represented by seven separate, yet equally funny people. The Amanda who directs the crime and the comedians who prosecute the audience and make them laugh. These are their stories."

….those are the opening lines (that I just made up because I can, because I blog and stuff) for Law & Order: The SVUsical (you know, the MUSICAL. The musical that you would be a dummy for not catching THIS FRIDAY--and running every Friday and Saturday through August 29 [except Aug. 14-15]--at Dallas Comedy House).

What was the inspiration for writing Law and Order: The SVUsical?

Grant: It was originally pitched by Lauren Davis for an assignment in our Leve 3 sketch class. The assignment was to pair up two things that don't usually go together. She came in with Law and Order: The Musical. After writing and performing a 10-minute version of it, we decided that we needed to elaborate on the idea and make it a full-length show. Susie: What Grant said. Christian: Lauren pitched L&O: The Musical for our sketch 3 show back in April, and we loved it. We did a compressed version in our sketch show and when we were through with that we all said, "Let's make this a real thing!" Now three months later, here we are. Paulos: In our last sketch revue, Fraud City, Lauren Davis wrote a sketch called Law and Order the Musical. It was a big hit, everyone enjoyed it and still brought it up. We knew before we ended that run in March that we were going to do a full-length version. Sean: We really wanted to do a buddy-cop show in the vein of Turner and Hooch, so we came up with the idea to write a musical about Mr. Law and his dog Order. Lauren: Law and Order: The Musical was a sketch I wrote for our sketch 3 class. Amanda: It was a pitch from Level 3. I asked them to pitch two pop culture paradigms that don't normally co-exist. Lauren pitched Law and Order the Musical. It almost didn't make the cut, but it did. They had so much fun with it during the sketch 3 review, Fraud City, we decided to make it a full length musical.

Tell us about the writing process.

Grant: We watched musicals and episodes of Law and Order while writing down patterns that we noticed so that we could exploit them in our musical. After getting a list of characters and beats we knew we wanted to hit, we assigned scenes to everybody and met up the next week to pitch. I remember the first week that we all showed up with songs, and each one was so funny. Once enough songs were written, we just had to write the scenes to connect all of them. We still haven't stopped writing. People add lines here and there every time we run through the script. It's making for a show that is very dense with jokes. Christian: The writing process was much different for this than with sketch. We had to do a lot more conforming to a central story with this, so it took more time to craft that. We had a general story that we outlined our first meeting and then we all took it and kind of ran with it. Paulos: Writing with this group has always been the most frustrating...so much fun and but sometimes frustrating. It's cool, everyone is super talented, and most of the times we were just doing bits and laughing for hours. As far as the script and songs, it was very collaborative. We all edited or punched up everything. Sean: Everyone in this group is a strong writer, and we all trust each other to create great content. At the start of the process, we'd piece apart the different things we needed to write and assign them to different people, and then we'd bring them back to the group and help punch up each other's stuff. This is a group that really fires on all cylinders when it's working together, and we're most in our element when we're creating things with each other. Susie: There's a lot more pressure when writing for a group vs. writing for yourself. Write, edit, write, edit...edit, edit, edit. In fact, I think we kept writing and editing up until last week. Lauren: Like the painting of the Golden Gate Bridge, it is apparently never ending. Amanda: I think it's still going on...

Let's go behind the scenes. What did a typical rehearsal look like?

Grant: We'd all be outside on the stoop in our jean jackets. Drinking 40s and smoking drugs. Amanda would walk up and as she would unlock the door, we'd throw paper airplanes at her back and high-five each other for making such good paper airplanes. She'd shake her head and know that deep down, we did it out of love. After taking a couple hours to sober up, we'd go over notes from the previous week and run any scenes that had recent changes or trouble areas. Then a full run through with costumes and props, followed by more notes. After cleaning up, we'd go back to the stoop out front and pick up where we left off with our drugs and alcohols. Christian: Rehearsals changed over time as the musical came together. First is was just us trying to block the thing, then trying to remember lines and blocking, and now it's kind of honing and refining everything so it looks good for the show. Paulos: We had some pretty intense rehearsals. Typically groups meet up three hours a week. There were times were meeting up six hours two or three times a week. We're all very committed and also need your approval so we wanted to make something really special. Sean: Early on, it was just all of us sitting around a table coming up with great "what-if" ideas. I'm pretty sure there's about three great sketch shows' worth of content that got left on the cutting room floor. As the songs and scenes got finalized, we started rehearsing on the stage, blocking out the acts, and singing the songs with music. Susie: Six-to-10 hours of nonstop fun! We laugh and joke around a lot. Bits, bits, more bits, and then Amanda steps in and gets us to rehearse. Lauren: Depends on the day. Sometimes we focused on choreography, sometimes running transitions, writing songs, etc. Amanda: The first two months were writing sessions. Super fun. These bozos are really smart. Then we started blocking it in June, and in July we went to twice weekly practices then upped the game to three times a week. We had several rehearsals that were seven-hours long. They were productive, just long. There's a lot to consider with blocking/transitions/choreography/music/props when it comes to a musical, on top of memorizing the content and songs. Honestly, I've seen a lot of drama in theater in the past, but this group was so committed to making this show really fun for the audience, so any time there was tension, we nipped it in the bud pretty quickly. Usually with queso. Or beer. Or hugs.

Favorite memory of the production process?

Grant: Going out to take pictures for our posters was a lot of fun. Getting to see everyone in costume for the first time on top of a high-rise in Dallas. That's not a bad way to spend an evening with your friends. Christian: My favorite part of the whole process was pitching songs at the beginning. I had never written a song for a musical before, so it was a ton of fun writing out the lyrics and performing them in front of everyone at our writers meeting. Paulos: There are a lot to choose from. We've practically lived together for a couple of months writing this. Listening to the songs for the first time was so much fun, and I cried laughing a lot. One night recently, however, we had a pretty long rehearsal and everyone was beat up and tired and we had a group message going where everyone got home and got really excited at like 2 a.m. It was a cool thing, because we were tired but still so much more excited than tired. Sean: Oh, there's so many. One that comes to mind happened a couple of weeks ago. I had been out of town for a week, so I missed some rehearsal time. I came back, and at the next practice, during the run, the whole group did this super intense elaborate choreography that didn't exist before I left...I won't spoil anything, but I was dying. So that was pretty funny. Also, anytime Lauren's giggle box breaks. It's so fun to have someone who takes the show super seriously laughing uncontrollably because of a poop joke. Susie: My memory is shot from all the drinking and rehearsing. I wish we made a documentary of this: "Making of Law & Order: the SVUsical" (because I'm not creative with titles, apparently). We've been in over our heads since day one, but Amanda has always been there to guide us and pick up the pieces. Through the power of friendship, you can do anything! Lauren: Either hearing most of the songs for the first time or the time Amanda ordered us free pizza. Amanda: Honestly, and please don't tell them this, I'm sad I won't be spending all of my Sundays (and Mondays and Wednesdays and Saturdays with these boners). They're all so fun. I love them all equally in different ways. They're really smart, and I love being part of a project where everyone is just so dedicated to putting up good work. The amount of time they've put into this show is kind of unbelievable. I can't wait for it to open and everyone see all of their hard work. It's been an honor to direct them.

Law & Order: The SVUsical runs every Friday and Saturday through August 29 (except Aug. 14-15). 

Tori Oman is a Level Five student at DCH. She’s trained and performed with the Second City and iO in L.A. and Chicago. Favorite pastimes include being irrationally competitive at Monopoly, eating an apple in every country she’s traveled to, and being the sole person on this planet that thinks Necco Wafers are a delicious candy choice.