Tyler Johnston

Plaid to Meet You: Bonnie Criss

Plaid To Meet You is a new way to introduce the community to our performers. I will be choosing performers whose plaid patterns catch my eye. This week, my attention was caught by a wonderful brown-and-white plaid shirt worn by our very own Bonnie Criss. I sat down with her and got the info on that shirt and her feelings about improv. Bonnie CrissWow, great shirt Bonnie. Who are you wearing this evening? Thank you. Wow, so formal with your questions. It’s Runway Seven from JCPenney.

What made you choose that shirt this evening? It was a little chilly. I love plaid, and it’s soft.

So which troupes can we watch you perform with? Oh, are we done with questions about my shirt? I’m in Pretty People With Problems, Impractical Magic, and Pinot Memoir.

When can we watch you perform? Impractical Magic: 10/6 at 9 p.m. Pretty People with Problems: 10/8 at 8 p.m. Pinot Memoir: 10/19 at 9 p.m.

What attracted you to improv, and what keeps you performing? I love comedy. I want to have a career in it. All of my role models started by doing improv. Tyler (Johnston) got me started here. And you can perform in plaid.

Finally, what is one piece of advice you would give to all performers? Don’t hold back. It’s advice for myself, too. Sometimes if I don’t step out enough in a show, I feel bummed afterwards. So always trust your gut.

Collin Brown is a graduate of the Dallas Comedy House (DCH) Improv program. You can catch him around DCH any given night.

Sketch Speak: An Interview with LOOK AT US

You know that sinking feeling you get when you’ve done something awful, and you want to take it back so badly, but you can’t? All you can do is just let it wash over you, like a cold tomato bath after a skunky time. And constant readers, I had a pretty skunky couple of weeks. One of the skunkiest things (among many) involved me emptying out my phone cache to try and clear out some space. You want to know what was in there? Well, in addition to some priceless recordings of my grandfather telling a World War 2 story, I also lost my first ever interview with a Sketch 3 class from Dallas Comedy House (DCH).

This is a true story.

The good news is that I had the magic of the Internet and some really nice Sketch 3 people who were willing to redo the damn interview via Google Docs. Oh, Google Docs. You magical tomato bath, you.

LOOK AT US - posterSO, herein lies my interview with Ashley Bright’s Sketch 3 class, made of: Sallie Bowen, Tori Brenna, Bonnie CrissBrian HarringtonPatrick Hennessy, Cody Hofmockel, Tyler Johnston, and Kim Marr. They are all beautiful, lovely souls, and I apologize to them and my grandfather for my gross negligence. The sketch itself, in my humble opinion, was lovely – a reflection of themselves, really, with some of the most meta links the world famous DCH has ever seen. Not at all corny…though I think they’d take that as an insult.

So, let’s get on with it, then!

You've all been doing improv for a long time. What was the biggest change you had to make to start writing sketch? What was different or difficult about transitioning?

Sallie: Definitely doing homework. In improv, you come in, have fun, and go home. With sketch, there is a lot of work you have to put in outside of class. It was hard to discipline myself at first but I learned that if I could get my sketches done early in the week rather than waiting until last minute, I would usually end up with better quality work. Corn quality. (And so it begins.)

Patrick: Doing work outside of class. The beauty of improv is that it's all made up on the spot. You can decide to do an improv set anywhere, anytime. Any one of the sketches in our show was the product of hours of writing, tweaking, memorizing, and rehearsing. One of the things I found difficult was learning how to write dialogue that sounds natural. When you first start, it is very easy to write scenes that sound like two robots talking to each other.

Bonnie: I think committing to writing every day was definitely a change. You have to be really responsible for getting your work done, not just for yourself but for your classmates because everyone is relying on you to provide and put forth effort in the class to make a great show.

Brian: Yeah, with improv you just have to show up, do it, then you’re done. With sketch, you’ve really got to put in effort outside of class and, even harder than that, is not waiting until the morning of your class to do that work.

Cody: Doing work outside of class was the biggest change and the most difficult part of transitioning.

Tyler: The biggest change I had to make was really putting in the work outside of class. There’s more homework in sketch than improv, so preparing yourself for that transition was definitely tough.

Kim: I really struggled with the inner monologue of, “Wow, everything you are writing is terrible. You aren’t funny at all. Why are you doing this!?!?” Is this too personal? I hope not. My favorite part of improv is getting to ignore that voice on stage because there is just no time for it. Writing provided plenty of time for me to dwell on it.

What advice would you give to improvisers interested in taking sketch?

Sallie: DO IT. Just do it. It's so fun and so rewarding. It's definitely different than improv, but I think everyone should do it. Also, take it with some friends or people you like. Improv is a personal journey, while sketch is more of a group experience. We all were friends and knew each other before class so I think it made for a more enjoyable experience

Patrick: If possible, take sketch with friends. If you can’t do that, become good friends with the people in your class. You’re going to spend a lot of time with these people and occasionally you might have to give someone your honest opinion. It’s all much easier if you really know, enjoy, and respect them.

Bonnie: Do it! It’s so fun having gone through all the levels of improv because improv really helps you learn about the structure of scenes and how they look and feel, and when you get to sketch, you know how a scene should look and feel and you’re able to write with so much more confidence.

Brian: A lot of the fun of improv is building a scene, which you still get to do with sketch, but on a grander scale. How many improv scenes have you been like, “Aw man, I wish I had made this move or I wish they had made that move.” Sketch gives you a chance to really get that group mind going. Also, if you can work corn into your show, it’s good luck. (Straight from the husk, this one.)

Tyler: Find your voice and write toward your and your classmates' strengths. Once you start to get to know each other, it makes it easier to say, “Oh, so-and-so can do this weird voice really well, I can incorporate that.” But, don’t forget to know yourself and write for yourself, too. If you think you can write a really bomb sketch and you can knock it out of the park, then do it!

Cody: Write what makes you laugh. Remember to still yes-and your own ideas and the ideas of others. It’s easy to start coming up with reasons why a sketch doesn’t work. It’s far more productive to figure out how to make it work. You’re going to want to throw away a lot of ideas. Resist that and you’ll probably surprise yourself.

Kim: Do it! You’ll probably learn something and become friends with a great group of people. I did. It’s made me more confident in my performance as an improviser, as well. Do your homework earlier than the morning of class!

LOOK AT US - corn posterHow does Ashley help you write? How much of a hand does she have in making the final product?

Sallie: Ashley was our voice of reason. She was honest with us and told us when our ideas were dumb. She always pushed us to do better. She is the most supportive, smart, angel-haired teacher. She would listen to us spout our insane ideas for this show and she'd lay it out for us. She'd say, "OK, here are the risks, but if you want to do it let's f**king make it happen."

Bonnie: Ashley was the best Sketch 3 teacher this group of weirdos could have had. We were constantly throwing out crazy ideas, and she really helped us wrangle them in and hone our sketches.

Brian: Ashley is Wonder Woman and her lasso of truth kept us from getting too out of control, but if you saw the show, she still gave us plenty of wiggle room. (And what glorious wiggling it was.) Ashley was fantastic in looking at the first draft of a sketch, trimming the fat, finding the meat, and shucking the corn. (!!!) She never tried to write her own sketches; she’s got her own show for that. She just made our writing the best it could be.

Patrick: Yeah, it’s easy to go from a simple funny pitch to a cluttered confusing sketch. Ashley would help us focus on what the sketch was really about and cut out anything unnecessary. She also acted as the director of the show, so she had a say in the final run order and whether or not something would get cut.

Cody: Ashley taught me to read so personally she’s played a key role in helping me write. She made us do important things like write sketches, put a show together, and stop talking about corn for a second. She pushed us to do something “different” but probably saved a lot of audience lives by making sure we were the right kind of “different.”

Tyler: Ashley knew most of us really well going into the sketch class, so I think she had an idea of the kind of shenanigans she was getting into. We’re a beautifully, weird bunch, and she made sure we were polished weirdos. She made us go past the obvious corn jokes and dig deeper into the corn field that is Sketch 3.

Kim: Ashley was super supportive of all of our ideas, but was also a voice of reason because we had some crazy ones. She definitely kept us in check but allowed us to explore the weird depths of our hearts. Basically, she was like our mom who put a leash on us at the zoo. (Dare I go for a “and Harambe didn’t try to kill you” joke? Nah. Not my bit.)

I seem to remember the answer to the last question – I asked them what they would be if they were a vegetable. First, they said they would be [redacted], and then they changed their minds and said "corned lizard."

Sallie: I still stand by [redacted]. [Redacted] 4 life. Corn 4 life. Corn is life. Do you believe in life after corn?

Tyler: [redacted] Corn.

Bonnie: [REDACTED] FOR LIFE. BUT ALSO JUSTICE FOR CORN!

Brian: Cody asked Kim to say [redacted] to whatever the next question was. This was the next question. I wish you still had the audio, but I guess you can’t have your [redacted] and eat it too. (I blame the Android OS for confusing my dumb brain.)

Cody: I thought you said animal. It could be a [redacted] corned lizard. Damn, Brian, that was a great pun. Kim answered “[redacted]” to one of the questions but I was the only one who heard so I wanted her to say it again. The rest is Kimstory.

Patrick: It was def animal. “Corned Lizard” is very formal and that ain’t me. I prefer the more colloquial name, Corny Toad.

Kim: I just want everyone to know that after the initial interview, I went up to Cody at the bar and had to confirm that I had the right definition of [redacted]. (You sure did, Kim. You sure did.)

To round things off, I asked Ashley some questions as well.

What's different about teaching sketch vs. teaching improv?

Ashley: Improv is creating a free-flying ball of energy and support out of thin air; it's magic. Sketch is like if you caught that ball, choreographed some moves, practiced them, and became the Harlem Globetrotters.

What is your favorite thing about teaching sketch?

Ashley: The thing I love about teaching sketch is seeing the work pay off. In sketch, you can watch the tiniest half-baked idea become a fully fleshed-out performance. I get to watch the work go into it and watch the progress. It's like watching a time-lapsed video of a tree growing, and I love it.

What was it like teaching this group of writers?

Ashley: This group of writers have etched a li’l corn-shaped spot in my heart. They're these silly, cool kids with immense talent. Each of them. They probably could've skated by on that talent and charm, but they went to work. Citronella lives. 

~

And that’s all she wrote. Now if you’ll excuse me, I have to go let the tomato drain out of my tub. If you’d like to experience other sketch shows like this one, or maybe even get involved in one yourself, head over to the classes section of this website to learn more.

Emily Baudot is a Level Five improv student. When she isn’t at the theater, she’s drinking at one of the bars down the street and trying to justify ordering dessert for dinner.  Or, she’s on her computer pretending she’s a banished orc maiden, whichever one sounds healthier to you. If her crippling addiction to sugar and caffeine doesn’t kill her, she can be seen on stage with the soon to be world famous Wild Strawberry and the already-Internet famous Wiki-Tikki-Tabby (just kidding, they do go online a lot though). She’s also a Pisces because that means something.

(Top Image: Patrick Hennessy. Bottom Image: Ashley Bright)

Troupe Talk: Pretty People With Problems

Pretty People With Problems Dear Dallas Comedy House (DCH) friends, family, and of course, Mr. Vernon,

Pretty People With Problems accepts the fact that they’ve had to sacrifice a whole lot of time and energy, time originally guided by the wonderful Nikki Gasparo and now guided by the equally wonderful Ashley Bright, to flush out and hone a wild idea for an improvised teen movie. They’ve all practiced really hard together, and it’s crazy inspiring to see how far they’ve come. So, “Who exactly are they?” you ask. Well, you may see them as just a posse of unruly, free-spirited improv kiddos, but they’re definitely more than that. They’re a troupe of incredibly talented players who genuinely love to “yes and...” and support each other on and off the stage. With shows chock full of silly scenarios, zany casts of characters, and plenty of talk about Jerrell’s butthole, Pretty People With Problems is helping audiences relive their glorious high school moments: the good, the bad, and the embarrassing. With a lot of love and a whole lot of weird, they bring to life those precious moments rife with acne, angst, and possibly a rockin’ John Hughes soundtrack. In the simplest terms, Pretty People With Problems is the stellar combination of a Cody... a Jerrell and a Sallie...a Tyler and a Brian...a Bonnie...and a Natalie (a.k.a. Buffy in a young Meryl Streep disguise).

Does that answer your question?

Sincerely yours,

The Breakfast/Improv Club (it’s a dual purpose organization)

To start us off, let’s hear the super teen-angsty, melodramatic origin story of how Pretty People With Problems came to be.  

Cody: I was smoking pot behind a dumpster and writing poetry with my tears when Natalie told me Brian had told her that Tyler told him that Bonnie told her that Sallie said that Jerrell said that Nikki Gasparo said I had shit my pants in the cafeteria and that Ms. Bright slipped in it and gave me detention. I looked Natalie in the eyes and threw my letterman jacket on the ground and said, “I need redemption.” Then I messaged everyone on AIM and asked if they wanted to do a teen drama. No one wanted to, but they were all into improv, so I skated all the way to Keller, Texas, where Nikki lived, and we had our first practice.

Sallie: It was a dark, stormy night in the mid-1990s. Brian was working in his father’s grocery store, closing up because he was that kid with adult problems. Tyler was smoking a cigarette outside, just not giving a f***. Bonnie and Natalie cruised up in their BMW convertible with a bottle of vodka and techno music blasting on the radio. Cody was hiding behind the building filming everyone for one of his “art films.” Jerrell flew in on a cloud, and no one was certain whether he was human or God. Sallie was mopping up the parking lot and watching porn on her phone. Suddenly, a bolt of lightning struck and permanently banded these seven individuals together. Pretty People With Problems was formed.

Jerrell: I wasn't there for the very, very beginning, but from what I understand is that I was brought in as a season one guest star to shake up the personal relationships of the main cast but then I stuck around. It pays to hang around the craft services table a.k.a. chill out at Brian and Tyler's apartment while they're practicing because you're too hungover to go home.

Natalie: Brian and I have always been the dearest of friends, enabling each other to watch cable, instead of studying or binging on junk food and classic romance films (with the sound muted and our own dialogue, of course). And, don't forget the platonic sleepovers and make-out practice sessions. BEST BUDDIES. Then, of course, we always yearned for the attention of our high school's "it" duo, Cody and Jerrell, but flawlessly covered up our desperation with plenty of sarcasm and wit. Anytime Brian or I needed some sage advice, we consulted the original club sponsor/home-ec teacher, Ms. Bowen. No matter the situation, Ms. Bowen could always make me feel better, see the error of my ways, or realize which pill to take. It’s weird, though, I also always seemed to feel like her wisdom had an underlying message about my relationship, which was totally platonic, with Brian. Anyway, the coolest and most badass rebel, Tyler, looked in every room and hallway with a sexual tension that excited Brian and me, but we figured he'd eventually just fall for Ms. Bowen, and they would have some kind of sordid tryst that resulted in jail time and/or a pregnancy. Bonnie came into the picture when she moved here from Idabel, Oklahoma. She was the sweetest, little small-town girl with perfect grades. Brian and I pooled our spare change and sour patch kids together to bet on when she'd finally indulge in her dark side. And that's basically it, but, hey, it's only junior year, right?

Bonnie: Ugh. Total drab of a story. I don't know if you know Nikki Gasparo, but she basically rules the school. She's like the Queen B. And by “B,” I mean BITCH! No, she's amazing! She came up with the idea for an improvised teen drama and we all orgasmed in unison and started the troupe.

For people who may not be familiar with you guys, what can someone expect to see at one of your shows? What's your format or style?

Cody: We ask the audience for a problem they had in high school, then we put on a narrative, ”dramatic” show, in which we try to bring that problem to life. They can expect to see horse girls, dumb jocks, smart jocks, pill-addicted bitches, smelly skater boys, bug-boy, Poot the kleptomaniac, pooping in the cafeteria, teachers at prom, a cool opening credits video, and Jerrell’s butthole.

Sallie: We do an improvised teen drama in a narrative format. You can expect to see all your favorites: the slutty cheerleader, the mysterious bad boy, the pompous jock, the insecure school guidance counselor, the stoner, the horse girl, the bug boy, etc.  

Jerrell: It's VERY dramatic. Like the TNT of the theater. We love drama. But, essentially, we come out to a staple teen drama song looking very good and grab an audience suggestion of a high school issue and we play off of that. And somewhere along the way feelings are confessed and there's a lot of yelling.

Natalie: We begin with an air of drama and an audience member's personal high school obstacle. From there, we present a no-frills, totally unfunny and seriously serious adaptation of One Tree Hill/The O.C./Beverly Hills 90210/Melrose Place/Dawson's Creek/Gossip Girl/My So-Called Life/Degrassi High/Degrassi: The Next Generation.

Bonnie: Basically you will see a lot of sighing and Sallie playing human/animal characters. We also love to open and close lockers and backpacks, to really give our show that high school feeling.

If you could go back in time and give your teenage, high school self some advice, what would it be?

Cody: DUMP HER! And definitely don’t F***ING BRING HER TO DALLAS WITH YOU AND MOVE IN WITH HER YOU DIPSHIT! RUN AWAY! RUN! Also, when you get to Dallas don’t wait three years to go to Dallas Comedy House. Or do, because you’ll like the people you have class with. Whatever. Hey, don’t Bogart the joint, man.

Sallie: STOP SKIPPING CLASS, YA DUMMY.

Jerrell: Chill out. No matter how much that straight dude flirts with you, he's just doing it for the attention. And wash your face at night, you deserve clear skin.

Natalie: STOP GIVING ANY DAMN F***S! And am I kind of crushing on Brian, or do we just spend too much time together AS FRIENDS??

Bonnie: Keep eating lunch in the library. It's so much more peaceful in the library than in the lunchroom. Plus you're never going to get to see a food fight, so what's the point.

Teen movies are often all about those badass girl cliques. If life were a teen movie, what fictional #girlsquad would each of your troupe mates be part of and why? (Yes, Natalie, you can provide what teen drama stereotype/trope they’d be. Whatever makes you happy, boo.)

Cody: I know who’s in this troupe and how good they are at this sort of thing. My knowledge of pop-culture is painfully inadequate, so I’m going to let the others take this one.

Sallie: Natalie would be in Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s clique or she would be Buffy herself. She is so obsessed with that show that I’m starting to think she is Buffy.

Bonnie: Natalie would be a part of... Well she just would be Buffy the Vampire Slayer. So would Brian. They are both Buffy because they are so badass and they have great hair.

Sallie: Brian would be part of the Plastics in Mean Girls because he is a badass, boss bitch that runs things. (Seriously, he is the bar manager at DCH. Check out the new menu!)

Natalie: Brian would be the field hockey captain and the sweet, loveable class president who also isn't afraid to let lose because he's a great leader and hella admirable. Also fit.

Sallie: I think Cody would be a part of the Heathers because he might murder someone.

Bonnie: Cody is definitely Regina from the Plastics because he is such a conniving, secret-starting, boyfriend-stealing, witch!

Natalie: Cody would be the section leader in the school choir, just to hear his own voice more, and he would also be the newest member of the pottery club because he wanted to meet an artsy girl that doesn't have dreadlocks but also doesn't judge anyone for having them.

Sallie: Jerrell would be a Spice Girl in Spice World because he really is a real-life pop star.

Bonnie: Jerrell would be Cher from Clueless because he has the best wardrobe and he is very persuasive. And he has great cheekbones.

Natalie: Jerrell would be the drill team captain who lights up a fat doobie under the bleachers before every halftime show but still has the best high kick you'll ever see. He is loveable as f*** but down-to-earth.

Bonnie: Sallie would be Dionne from the clique in Clueless because she pulls off a nose ring so well and she don't take shit from no gross bitch with a fake weave.

Sallie: Sallie would be one of the detentioners in The Breakfast Club. Most likely the quiet girl with dandruff because sometimes she really does get dandruff and she’s kind of creepy.

Natalie: Sallie would be the school principal on the fast track to being superintendent, but she gets it on with the weird goth kids because she's sexy as hell and could rock leather.

Sallie: Bonnie would be part of the T-Birds from Grease, because I could see her cruising in a sick ride, looking for chicks and greasing back her hair with a comb she keeps in her back pocket.

Natalie: Bonnie would be the bad virgin/clean teen that wants to remain pure but likes getting carried away with dirty talk and weenie play, because she's sweet and hot. Tyler would the president of the AV club, or the school DJ, or the bitchiest klepto you'll ever meet, because he's the bitchiest klepto you'll ever meet. He's also banging Sallie/Ms. Bowen.

Sallie: Tyler would be part of the Toro’s in Bring It On because he is very cheerful, supportive, and probably has a sick round-off back handspring.

Bonnie: Tyler would be Gretchen from the Plastics because he's always starting incredibly ridiculous rumors. These are just two he started at my high school. "Demi Lovato is giving the graduation speech," and "We're getting a Chick-fil-A in the cafeteria!"

Speaking of Plastics and Mean Girls, if you ever found a Burn Book with your picture in it, what do you think would be written about you?

Cody: Probably something like, “He has a big head, both metaphorically AND literally.”

Sallie: There would probably be a very frizzy-haired picture of me and under it would say, “Does she even go here?”

Jerrell: My burn would be something like, "Yikes...kinda desperate." But my picture would look great.

Natalie: “Eats a lot of cheese, ...like, a LOT!”

Bonnie: “Bonnie eats her corn like she's trying to get it off.”

What do you enjoy most about getting to play with this particular group of people?

Cody: When we first started practicing, it was hard to be good, because we were all just being so stupid and cracking ourselves up. Ashley had to develop punishments for breaking. I think the silliness and making each other laugh is what I love most. Also, I have to give credit to the effort Ashley has put into this project. It’s nothing short of inspiring. The passion from everyone has been outstanding.

Sallie: Everyone in this group is an incredible performer and improviser. I am always looking forward to either practice or shows with them because we have so much fun with each other. Each one is a genuinely hilarious person, and we’re always cracking each other up.

Jerrell: These are some of the weirdest people I've ever played with. There's never any judgment about a move being made or a joke or whatever. Like, this entire troupe is so weird, and it's the best. I don't know; it's super freeing knowing that I can do whatever dumb, weird thing I want to and they “yes and” it.

Natalie: I love and adore this group so incredibly much, because while we're all friends and mesh really well, we also each have unique and distinct qualities/styles/personalities. We make each other laugh a lot, and I think that's a great place to start when your goal is to make other people laugh, too.

Bonnie: We all have so much fun together and we know and love teen dramas. Plus, I've seen all these people on the toilet and once you've seen that, a bond forms that's unexplainable and so amazing.

What rule of improv do you try to apply to your everyday life and why?

Cody: Oh wow, thank you for the soapbox.  I’m going to try to only put one foot on it. I guess I have to choose between “say yes” and “listen to the last thing said.” I think it would be the latter because I have a tendency to respond to things with “I” or “me” statements just to relate, and I want to work on really listening to and engaging with the other person in a conversation.

Sallie: “YES AND,” baby. I always try to say yes to new opportunities and experiences, and this has significantly broadened my horizons. Also, listening is so important, and since taking improv classes, I believe I am a better listener in my regular life.

Jerrell: Saying yes. That's so cliché, but I mean saying yes to everything, mostly to myself. I used to spend a lot of time being concerned about how other people felt about me and what I was doing, instead of how I was feeling and whatever. So, more specifically, saying yes to my feelings and what I want and need to do from moment to moment.

Natalie: Improv is a phenomenon to me because every concept/pillar can simply translate into or be applied to life. So, I can't choose a “single” concept that I apply, but in general, I see improv, in its purest sense, as an enchanting, mind-boggling and frustrating entity, which can also be said of life. Also, the support and respect I’ve seen and experienced in the DCH community, especially in regards to gender equality, is a security and love I know I am extremely lucky to have.

Bonnie: I always say yes. It just makes life so much more fun.

As with anything in life, movie quotes are always applicable. So let’s end this Q&A by coming up with a Pretty People tagline, using only teen movie quotes.

Cody: “Whatever I feel like I wanna do, gosh!” – Napoleon Dynamite; Alternate: “Yes… yes… yes…” – Napoleon Dynamite

Sallie: “Well you can’t kill me ‘cause I’m already dead. And I talked to God, and she says, ‘Yo wassup?’ and she wants you to lose the gun.” – Deb in Empire Records

Jerrell: "Do yo thang, Isis." – Bring It On

Natalie: "Shoulda used the window!" – Walter Stratford in 10 Things I Hate About You; Alternate: "It don't matter if you win by an inch or a mile. Winning's winning." – Dominic Toretto in The Fast And The Furious

Bonnie: "Why should I listen to you? You're a virgin who can't drive." – Tai from Clueless

Pretty People With Problems performs at DCH on June 1 and June 9.

Lauren Levine is currently a Level 5 improv and Sketch 2 student at DCH. When she is not trying to come up with witty things for this blog, she is a freelance writer and editor, an amateur photographer, a Zumba-enthusiast, a dog lover, and an 80s movie nerd. In addition, she enjoys all things Muppet-related, the smell after a rainstorm, and people with soft hands.

Comedy Centerfold: Tyler Johnston

Welcome to Comedy Centerfold, where we feature a Dallas Comedy House performer and get to know him or her a little better by using questions that Playboy centerfolds are usually asked.  Tyler JohnstonTyler Johnston is the actual scientist who discovered running water on Mars. Don't let those mucky-mucks at NASA tell you differently. When Tyler's not working at DCH or performing in his troupes Purple Reign (Sept. 30, Oct. 21, and Oct. 28), Shameless Pug (Oct. 17), and Pinot Memoir, or recording The Lobby podcast with Jerrell Curry and Brian Harrington, he's astrophysicing (that's a technical term) all over the universe. Heck, Neil deGrasse Tyson even once said after meeting Tyler, "We've got a badass over here."

Hometown? I was born in Embrun, Ontario, Canada. It's a tiny town surrounded by cow farms and trees. There was always this rumor going around that they would open up a McDonald's and, to this day, it hasn't happened. When I was nine, I moved to Allen, Texas, and I've been (almost) fully Americanized.

Guilty Pleasures? The one pleasure I feel most guilty about is probably peanut butter. Kraft (as in Kraft Mac & Cheese) has a brand of peanut butter that's mostly sold in Canada so whenever I visit there, I bring back a large tub of it. My parents brought one back two weeks ago, and I'm almost finished with it because I keep eating spoonfuls of it.

Ambitions? I often find myself day dreaming about being a writer for a television show. Oddly enough, the part that I think about a lot is how satisfying it must feel to write an idea down and post it on a white board. So I guess my current ambition is to be able to have an idea good enough to be written on a Post-it note.

Best Concert? I'm not ashamed to say Lady Gaga has been my favorite concert so far. It was her 2010 The Monster Ball Tour, and it was like watching a musical theater show rather than a concert. That Lady put a tremendous amount of thought into every part of that concert, and she has all my respect.

Favorite Book? I don't know this counts but I'm still in the middle of reading The Silence of the Lambs, and it has been my favorite book so far. Clarice and Hannibal are much more sassier in the book than they are in the movie. I wish they kept some elements of the book in the movie like Hannibal reading Italian Vogue.

Favorite Movie? I'll never get tired of watching Scream. The sequels are great and all, but the first movie really has a way with balancing wit and terror. The opening scene with Drew Barrymore never fails to make me squirm. I also have a great admiration for Sidney Prescott's over-sized sweaters, and most of my wardrobe is based off her style, if I'm being completely honest.

Favorite TV Show? The serious side of me wants to say Six Feet Under but really, the first two seasons of Grey's Anatomy were absolute gold. Seattle Grace is probably the most unethical and dangerous hospital ever but it made for some over-the-top, dramatic material. Nothing can top a bomb being lodged into a patient with a surgeon's hand stuck in the patient's wound.

Pets? I have two dogs, Dash and Dakota, and two cats, Molly and Nellie. My dogs are adorable but my cats are the biggest weirdos I know. Nellie is one of the only cats I know that loves swimming, and Molly will start to drool on you if she starts purring.

Foods I Crave? Besides wanting to eat a Big Mac at any moment in the day, sunflower seeds are the major food I crave. I used to eat them every day when I was younger whenever I watched a show or movie. I've cut my habit back a bit recently, but I still crave them the most. I think I had to stop mostly due to me being so messy with the seed shells.

People I Admire? Jenny Slate is definitely the comedian that I admire the most right now. I've always loved that she's unapologetically silly with the way she approaches comedy. One of my favorite videos on YouTube is Jenny Slate describing the time she was way too stoned during her astronomy class in college. Her writing and acting style is so carefree and goofy, so naturally I look up to her.

Dream Role? I've always wanted to have a role where I wake up in bed during a nightmare and start screaming. I feel like shooting those scenes must be ridiculously fun. That role, or be the person that Jason Bourne pushes out of the way during an action sequence. Basically, I would love to play a very dramatic extra with a maximum of two lines.

Favorite Song to Sing? I catch myself singing "Work It" by Missy Elliott on a daily basis. If I'm in the middle of a conversation and someone says, "Is it worth it?" I have to resist the overwhelming urge to bust out into full Missy mode. Each verse of that song is so witty and catchy that I can't help myself from finding a way to incorporate it into daily conversations.

Good First Date Idea? Rock climbing, for sure. What better way to start off getting to know someone than by watching them get exhausted after 10 minutes of climbing a wall? Afterwards, you can gab about how fun it looked but how hard it was.