pro wrestling

What We're Loving Year-End Spectacular (Part Two)

We've loved many things this year - books, movies, tv shows, websites, people - but these things we loved the A-Number One Best. U-Talkin-U2-to-Me-HiIn 2014, my favorite thing in comedy was the Dallas Comedy House. No doubt about it. But since this blog belongs to them, it would make me feel like a total sell out if I just wrote about how much I love that place. AND I’M NOT A SELL OUT. I streamed a Dead Kennedy’s album this week!

What I’ve loved this year more than anything else has been the Earwolf podcast U Talkin’ U2 To Me? Somehow, I didn’t write about this show once in any of my fifty (I’m the Takashi Miike of What We’re Loving) entries into this blog in 2014. That changes today.

U Talkin’ U2 To Me? is a podcast with a simple premise; Scott (Aukerman of Comedy Bang Bang) and Scott (Adam Scott of Parks & Rec and Party Down) sit down to discuss the work of the band U2. Originally, they were going to record the show for a month or two in advance of the release of the 2014 U2 album, but when it was delayed for months they decided to keep recording. And they created some of my favorite audio I’ve ever heard.

The lesson that I’ve drawn from U Talkin’ U2 To Me? is something that I’m going to try and apply to my work even more in 2015. Their show is technically really bad. They don’t stay on point, they record in the middle of the night so they’re delusional, and with the work schedule that both of them have, they are usually exhausted. The thing that makes their show special is that you can tell they legitimately love what they’re doing. There are so many important elements to performance but they’re all pretty meaningless if you don’t have fun and enjoy it. This podcast reminded me of that and thus, was something that I truly loved this year. - David Allison

images2014 is almost over you guys! How excited are you to just end this mess and start fresh in 2015? Personally, this year has been crazy trying for me. Between family issues and life smacking the crap out of me; emotionally I am drained and January 1 cannot come fast enough. Despite it all though I’ve had some pretty fun experiences and learned some junk about myself.

So this post of “What We’re Loving in 2014” is completely about me. Yup! All me, me, me.

Growing up I was never much of talker. If I ever had to get serious about something I would just write it out in order to avoid the awkward conversation. Talking sucked. Back then writing came easy and that was my outlet. That was because I wasn't aware of the rules of writing. Honestly, I am still unaware of the rules of writing. I often joke around and ask real writers what an adverb or adjective is and I always get a good chuckle from it. But seriously, what are they? I have no clue. It is in my complete ignorance that I find myself most proud.

I didn’t start writing articles and blog pieces until this year because I was embarrassed by my lack of skill and knowledge. I just didn't want anyone to see me as not all that smart or funny. Mainly the latter. Don’t get me wrong, as a actor and a comic I’ve written plenty of things but they were and are more of a ramble than a structured piece. It wasn't until my friend DeAndre decided to start his own blog driven website that I considered writing. He asked all of my friend if we wanted to write and being the supportive person I am I said sure. Did I mention my lack of basic knowledge in the rules of writing? Well, after months of stalling and all my friends writing awesome pieces about various topics I bite the bullet and wrote a fun piece about Girl Meets World - that is sequel to Boy Meets World that follows Cory and Topanga’s daughter Riley. (By the way, the show is terrible. Save yourself and your childhood memories by not watching it) Needless to say I was extremely scared to submit that piece for fear of what the person editing my little article would say. In fact, below is the warning I placed at the beginnning of the article to absorb any potential judgement:

Hey so before you make this bleed with your red pen there are a couple things you should know. I am not a writer and I have no clue what I’m doing. I’m just a girl who is sometimes funny, hears voices in her head, and thinks it’d be interesting to write out the conversation they have. Please don’t jugde me too hard.

Yup. All that lovely insecurity came directly from me. Truth is I’m extremely insecure about everything. Why else would I want to be an actor? Submitting any sort of work for other to read or view is terrifying to me so the fact that I do this for a living is pretty scary. I don’t like talking to people after shows and I feel like I’m being a jerk imposing my thoughts and ideas on random strangers. In my heart of hearts and deep down in my cold cold heart I know that is not true but who listens to the voice of reason? Ultimately, I just want people to like me and the crazy things I have to say.

What I discovered that I love this year is my courage. Like I said, I’m terrified of everything and that one silly little article showed me that its okay actual try something and put yourself there. You see I don’t know what I’m doing and I okay with that. I think that is what makes this whole writing thing that much more fun. Since my Girl Meets World review, I’ve writing a bunch of stuff including some fun bloggy pieces for the world famous Dallas Comedy House. You may have heard of it. It’s important for me to mention a couple of things about my new found courage though

1) I will still never ride a rollercoaster. 2) Yes I’m still super insecure but at least now I can deal with it. 3) Make like Nike and Just Do it. You never know what you’re awesome at. 4) I still have no clue what an adjective is and I don’t care anymore either.

- Rachel Hall

20141125_RawGOTN_articleMy favorite thing about 2014 was Concessions Kane. I thought it was a funny idea and it made me laugh. - Mike Corbett

 

 

 

 

personalgrowthFor me, 2014 was a year of tremendous growth – of facing discomfort and stepping outside my comfort zone to grow as a person. There were plenty of tears, heartbreak, and misery in 2014 for me, as tends to the be case in life. However, there was even more laughter, joy and friendship throughout the year.

A lot of times we feel like growth has to come dramatically, from some stirring New Year's resolution to hit the gym for two  hours a day. We slink into feelings of failure when such grandiose dreams fail to come true. I’ve learned that it takes no such lofty ambitions to achieve great rewards. Seven years ago as a High School senior, I had to eat lunch in the bathroom because I was too terrified of people to actually sit in the Cafeteria. Even though I’ve come a long way, getting to know so many people at DCH was still a daunting task.

My growth came in small moments – sometimes doing something uncomfortable in improv and getting to know classmates and troupemates. More often, it came from deciding that I needed to hang around the bar at DCH and make myself talk to people, despite the utter discomfort and initial hours spent lurking in the corner trying to pretend I was texting someone on my phone. I would rather have gone home and played Assassin’s Creed from the comfort of my couch, but that wouldn’t help me grow as a person. So I stayed, endured the awkwardness, and somehow managed to not only feel comfortable around lots of people, but to make amazing friends and enjoy myself. I’m so thankful for the opportunities that were given to me, and I intend to make the most of them! I forced myself out there, and eventually....slowly....it paid off! – Ryan Vicksell

american-music-pop-music-collage-2014In the year 2014, I became a year older. My legs, my arms, my lungs, my brains, etc. all became a year older. That is no surprise, of course, but the one thing that is really shocking is that my musical taste in 2014 became much younger. So, what happened? Well, if you are like me, then the music that you were loving in 2014 was fresh and alive and brimming with……youth!

This is the year that Lenny Kravitz released a CD that never charted in the US, Green Day put out a collection of “greatest hits” that no one wanted, and U2 gave every iTunes customer a free album, which we promptly complained about and deleted from our libraries. Instead we bowed at the throne of Lorde, tickled our “Fancy” with Iggy Azalea, and were “All About That Bass” with Meghan Trainor. I literally own sweatshirts older that all of them, yet they have somehow managed to craft music that is sticking with me far better than many of the heroes of my past these days. Heck, the band whose sound that I am crushing hard on right now are the “Cool Kids” of Echosmith…….and two of them are still in HIGH SCHOOL!

It took a little getting used to, especially when I attended The Neighborhood’s show this summer and realized that I could possibly be the oldest person in attendance not chaperoning a child. Slowly but surely this year’s catchy hooks infiltrate your brain, however, and eventually grab a hold of your heart. American Authors are there to make sure I have the “Best Day of My Life. “I Wanna Get Better” thanks to Bleachers and Fall Out Boy inspires me to rise like “The Phoenix” and aspire to be known for “Centuries”. Suddenly those old limbs seem revived and able to run longer when attached to an iPod full of 2014’s glorious earworms.

I don’t know what 2015 has in store, but if it sounds anything like 2014, then I am all ears. - Glen Smith

1505644_10152390427495350_581480141263445905_nReview on Comedy Central was the best TV show I saw all year, Guardians of the Galaxy was the best movie, and Raymond Chandler's Farewell, My Lovely was my favorite read of the year, but the one thing I love over and above everything else was the Dallas Comedy House. I'm not afraid to be a sell out.

I started taking classes here at DCH in October of last year. A year ago around this time I had my Level One Showcase with a little group known as Canadian Tuxedo. Never in my life has I felt such joy. I came to DCH expecting to find a whole bunch of comedy nerds who were bitter and judgmental and mocked me for being so sweaty. Instead I found a whole bunch of cool people who were creative and fun and welcoming. Over the past year I moved through the levels of improv and sketch, joined a few improv troupes, collaborated on some sketch shows, and made some of the best friends I've ever had. For the first time in a long time I found a place were I felt like I belonged. For the first time in a long time I found a place where I could be myself.

The past few months took me away from Dallas and way from the Comedy House. I miss it every day. Right now I'm working at what is essentially my dream job. There's no way I would be here if not for DCH. There's no way I get this job without saying "Yes, and" to life. There's no way I can even do this job without the ability to dive into writing a scene or a sketch and write improvisationally. My 2014 was spent largely at DCH. I was creatively transformed; rebuilt and made better, as a writer, as a performer, and as a person.

Thanks to everyone at DCH who made this past year so wonderful. I'd thank people by name, and highlight their awesomeness, but I'd inevitably leave someone out and Mike Maiella would get mad at me. (In this scenario, Mike is the one I leave out. And we all know how he gets when he's riled up.) But I really couldn't end this without saying to the assembled members of Canadian Tuxedo, Johnny Soso, H.A.M.F.I.S.T., Chili's to Go, our Level Five Class Whose Troupe Name I Forgot, Finale, Primary Colours, Duck Duck Pants, Awkward Silence, Neapolitan, Sketch One, Sketch Two, Charles Dicken's Great! Expectations, and the assembled cast and crew of The Investment, The Theft, and Boost!, I love you all and miss you all so much. - Ryan Callahan

What We're Loving: Fake Letters, Bad Movies, Best Friends, Japanese Climax

Each Friday, DCH performers, teachers, and students offer their recommendations for what to watch, read, see, hear, or experience. This week David Allison hopes to cure his loneliness, Amanda Hahn suggests a visit to the bad part of town, Jonda Robinson doesn't leave her house, and Ryan Callahan is exited for climax.  jpegBooks are the worst. In the fight between sitting down to read a book and going to a cool party, going to a cool party is usually the winner. In fact, going to a cool party is like the Mike Tyson of the category. Sadly, Mike Tyson aged and doesn’t have it in him to battle off sitting down to read a book. And thus, the thing I’m loving this week, is a book. Gross.

My pick comes from one of my favorites, Jon Glaser. Even if you don’t remember his name, you’ve most likely seen Glaser as a writer/walk on artist on Conan O’Brien in the 90s, the recurring character Councilman Jamm on Parks & Recreation, or the brilliant show Delocated. Oh, and let’s not forget about that time he got justifiably mad at Pete Holmes. Regardless of what you know him as, you should be aware of his talents as an author.

My Dead Dad Was In ZZ Top is a collection of short, fictitious letters written by Glaser. The concept of the titular story is that a son cleans out the possessions of his recently deceased father and discovers a number of letters written from the dad to the members of ZZ Top, before they were famous. Beyond that fantastic piece, you can look forward to hearing about Van Halen’s alternate band names, Prince’s set list from the bat mitzvah of Steven Spielberg's daughter, and lyrics from when David Bowie sold out and started parodying his own songs. You can actually find a recording of Glaser singing the Bowie song on an episode of the Fogelnest Files if you want to click this link and jump to the 19:53 mark.

So please check out this book so that I can have someone to talk to about the one book per year I read. - David Allison

MV5BMTcxMDkxNTMwNl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMzc5MjUzNA@@._V1_SX640_SY720_The recent announcement that writer/producer/director/star of The Room, Tommy Wiseau, is coming out with a new sitcom reminded me of all the “so bad, they’re good” movies I watched or planned on watching after seeing and becoming obsessed with The Room. One of those movies was the gorgeously titled Hobo with a Shotgun. It was inspired by the intentionally over the top, silly, fake trailer that appeared in Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino’s Grindhouse. The joke probably should have ended there. But I’m glad it didn’t. Keep in mind, it’s not a good movie (which is partly intentional), but it’s entertaining if you watch it knowing this. It starts out with a hobo moving to a new town where most people have completely lost their moral compass. To establish this, one of the first things we see in the movie is the wealthy womanizer that runs the city decapitating his brother, followed by an unknown female in a bikini gyrating over the blood squirting out of his neck. And in case you don’t understand yet that this is a town filled with scum, to really drive the point home, this town is called Scum Town. It’s unclear why any of the citizens that are horrified and run away screaming from these acts of scum still live in Scum Town, but I suppose all of us make strange choices in life.

For a while, the hobo just wanders around Scum Town, watching these acts happen. But then one of the kids in the town, played by Greg from Zenon Girl of the 21st Century, shoves another kid’s face into a literal PILE of cocaine and tries to kill a prostitute. Then Hobo begins his vigilante lifestyle, beating Greg from Zenon with a sock of coins. After becoming BFF with the prostitute, he buys a shotgun to stop a robbery/baby murder, and so begins Hobo’s killing/corny line rampage.

Overall, this movie is filled with graphic killings, people getting their dicks shot off, pedophile Santa Clauses, doctor-killing robot ninjas, groan-worthy lines, and dramatic speeches that include the title of the movie. If you’re in the mood for something cheesy, heavy handed, and downright cartoonish, ain’t nothing better than our dear friend: Hobo with a Shotgun, available on Netflix. - Amanda Hahn

playinghouse_btsinterviews_600x500Some days are just made for binge watching TV. I had one of those days this week, and at the recommendation of a friend I spent it immersing myself in the USA show Playing House. The show was created by and stars Jessica St. Clair and Lennon Parham (both from the Upright Citizens Brigade) playing two best friends at very different life stages--Emma (St. Clair) is a single, 30-something business woman who moved away as soon as she could, while Maggie (Parham) is a married, soon-to-be mom who never left their hometown. When it’s discovered that Maggie’s husband is cheating on her, Emma decides to support her friend by moving home to help her raise the baby.

I love these characters and this set-up because the dynamic reminds me of myself and my longtime BFF, and also because, if needed, I would totally raise a child with her. The other characters who populate the show are fantastic as well, with Jane Kaczmarek as Emma’s estranged mother, Zach Woods as Maggie’s brother, and Keegan-Michael Key as my favorite character, Mark, the local cop and former flame of Emma. (I could probably write this whole post about how much I like Mark, and all my favorite Mark moments, but I won’t, I’ll just say he’s cute and great and dependable and helpful and charming and I hope someday to find my own version of him, blah, blah, etc., etc., you get the picture.) A slew of great guests show up along the way, as well.

The show hasn’t been picked up for a second season yet, but my fingers are crossed, because there are things I need to know. If you’re reading this, anyone with any pull at the USA Network, hear my cry: PLEASE DON’T LEAVE ME HANGING! - Jonda Robinson

show_match_icon.phpIt's that time of year again. The G1 Climax is here! For those of you who are unfamiliar, which I assume is all of you, the G1 Climax is an annual professional wrestling  tournament held by New Japan Pro Wrestling. Yes, it is pro wrestling, but it's in JAPAN. Yes, it's still pre-determined, but you wouldn't know by watching the matches. Unlike the American style, which carries an air of "Trust us, this is all pretend," Japanese wrestling is all about believability. Fighting men, each with his own style, each with his own persona, go to war over the course of two weeks to determine who has the most "fighting spirit." The G1 Climax is the closest thing we'll ever get to the Kumite.

The G1 has produced so many memorable matches over there years. The Vader-Keiji Muto semifinal match from the inaugural tournament in 1991 had the crowd in Sumo Hall so excited that they showered the ring with pillows in celebration. The 1998 match between Genichiro Tenryu and Shinya Hashimoto is the gold standard for lumpy guys beating the piss out of each other. Last year's tournament featured my favorite match of the year, a slugfest between my personal favorite wrestler Katsuyori Shibata, whose gimmick is that he kicks people wicked hard, and Tomohiro Ishii, a bowling ball of a man who takes, and sells absurd punishment, and just keeps firing back.

This year's G1 is the biggest ever, with 22 wrestlers competing, including such people you may know, like A.J. Styles, Doc Gallows (formally Luke Gallows of CM Punk's Straight Society), Shelton Benjamin, and Davey Boy Smith, Jr., and people you should know, like Hiroshi Tanahasi (best wrestler in the world), Kazuchika Okada, AKA The Rainmaker (on his way to becoming the best wrestler in the world), the aforementioned Shibata and Ishii, and Minoru Suzuki, the surly former shooter who once wrestled a mechanical mummy.

I spent a week last August holed up in my brother's basement watching the G1. I plan to do the same this year from the comfort of my own couch, starting tonight. If you are a current or lapsed fan of pro wrestling, I highly recommend. The commentary is in Japanese, but the characters are so clear and the action so entertaining that you'll have no problem following. Every show is available on UStream. - Ryan Callahan

 

What We're Loving: Good Things Ending, In Car Giggling, Mile High Shopping, Fictional Assistants

Each Friday, DCH performers, teachers, and students offer their recommendations for what to watch, read, see, hear, or experience. This week David Allison faces mortality, Ashley Bright laughs at absurdity, Amanda Hahn explores the free market, and Ryan Callahan shocks the world. hqdefaultI’m terrified of death and want everything to go on forever. There, I said it! If I had my druthers all things that I enjoy would continue and it would be the law that they exist forever, or at least until I’m tired of watching them (RIP my interest in Dexter after Season Four). I was confronted with this existential crisis this week when I realized that a web series I’ve recently come to enjoy, Chicago Rats, is coming to an end after only three installments. Looking back, I should’ve realized that the warning signs were there all along. I mean, incredibly talented people like Saturday Night Live’s Mike O’Brien and Tim Robinson don’t waste their time on YouTube clips forever. And there wasn’t much of an arc that needed to be completed. And the first and second installments were literally labeled 1 of 3 and 2 of 3, but still, staring down that 3 of 3, knowing that something I enjoy is coming to an end, was not a fun realization.

If for some stupid reason you’re not aware of the random thing that I love this week, let me introduce you. Chicago Rats comes to us from The Above Average Comedy Network on YouTube. You may remember the online conglomerate as the same page that brought you Mike O’Brien’s  Seven Minutes in Heaven celebrity interviews these past few years. The same no budget production style is employed in these videos, the best of which is "Condo Nights". Nights is batting in the Empire Strikes Back slot in the lineup as the second of three and pits O’Brien, Robinson and fellow SNL writer Shelly Gossman as three clueless porn actors forced to improvise dialogue. Their cluelessness is perfect. The other two clips are worth checking out too, but realize, THERE ARE ONLY THREE. So if you want a reminder of your impending demise and the finality of all things, check out the entire three part series. - David Allison

Charles-Bukowski-Uncensored-CD-Bukowski-Charles-9780694524228I have not refreshed the stock of CDs (compact discs with audio files for you youngins)  that I keep in my car in quite some time.  I either hook up my phone, listen to 90.1, or select from the same slim rotation of CDs.  I'm simple and I have a short commute these days.  Heavy in that slim rotation is a Charles Bukowski Uncensored CD that I found at a yard sale a couple of years ago.  And when I put this CD in, I usually listen to the same two tracks on repeat.  The tracks are of him reading his poem, "The Genius of the Crowd."  First, I'll explain why I love this poem and then I'll explain why I listen to it repeatedly.  Aside from when he tells us to beware of folks who constantly read books, he strikes a lot of truth chords with me.  "Beware of the knowers" may be my favorite line because I am always leery of people who are strictly black and white with their beliefs - people who know what's right and wrong.  "Beware of those who are quick to praise for they need praise in return."  Not an absolute truth, but something that's true most of the time.  "Beware of those who detest poverty or those who are proud of it."  Again, he strikes on the absolutes. But here's the real reason I listen to this on repeat.  On the first reading, he pronounces absurdity as 'absurbity.' They let him read through without interrupting him. The next track they ask him to re-read it, but this time pronouncing it correctly.  He tries and keeps saying 'absurbity.'  He can't hear the difference.  Finally, his wife or ladyfriend attempts to walk him through the phonics.  He can do it slowly, but mispronounces it again when he tries to read the whole poem.  They all break up laughing.  I giggle every single time I listen to it.  A hard, raucous, alone in my car. giggle every single time.  If you ever want to listen to it, skip your Uber and I'll drive you home, and we can giggle together. - Ashley Bright

skymall3This week, I traveled out of town for work. Mid-flight on the way out of Dallas, I noticed something in the seat pocket in front of me that I had forgotten existed. It was the most entertaining magazine in the whole world. It was the SkyMall shopping catalog. I love SkyMall so much and laugh out loud every time I flip through it. I’m convinced the creators of the items look through the decoy gift boxes from The Onion and base actual products on those. Compare the pictures below. Based on the products themselves, it’s hard to tell which item is from The Onion and which item is a real product that you can actually buy with real money from SkyMall.

HahnWWL1

I’ll admit that some of the products are actually somewhat useful, just overpriced. However, most are ludicrous. Of the ludicrous, my two favorite categories are: 1) Tricking old people and 2) Is this for real?!

“Tricking old people” includes cleverly worded products (usually electronics) named to be appealing to old people that can be purchased far cheaper elsewhere. For example, you can buy a “VHS to DVD converter” (it’s a VHS/DVD player, and if you’re under the age of 75, you knew that already) for nearly $300 from SkyMall. The same thing can be purchased for about $200 less at…anywhere else. Don’t forget about the “Picture Keeper,” available for about $60. It’s nothing more than an 8 GB USB drive. As malicious as this trickery is, it has allowed for my favorite hobby of pointing at products with my mouth agape, looking around at my fellow passengers, mouthing “are you kidding me?”

“Is this for real?!” includes things like: boxes that are programmed to say “Lookin’ good, Bob” when opened. Or this giant gorilla statue surrounded by cheerleaders (it’s unclear whether cheerleaders are included with your purchase).

HahnWWL2

There is also this creepy bag that winks while you walk (it’s unclear why, why, why, why, why on Earth anyone would want this.HahnWWL3

Ladies and gentlemen, do not despair thinking you can only experience the joy of SkyMall on an airplane. I am happy to say that you can browse the SkyMall catalog online or have delivered right to your door, free of charge. If I haven’t convinced you to order it, then let the sole online review from six years ago do the talking: 4-stars from a guy with the username “justdoit.” And he recommends the catalog. - Amanda Hahn

clash18We've grown close enough over the past few months, dear reader, me sharing my thoughts on pop culture, you reading and occasionally acknowledging what you have read, that I'd like to think I can talk about professional wrestling again without fear of mockery or recrimination. Cool? Great, because the WWE Network now has every Clash of the Champions available for streaming.  Cancel my two o'clock, Miss Fletcher, I have some old wrestling to watch! (Miss Fletcher is the fictional assistant I pretend to call with the fake phone on my desk when I want my imaginary car brought around or I need to place a call to President Bartlet. Miss Fletcher is the best assistant a guy could have: smart, loyal, dedicated, and good with her fists. She's saved my life on more than one adventure. It's such a shame to see her slowly turning into a weremole.)

What was I talking about? Right, pro wrestling. For those who don't know, Clash of the Champions was an occasional live tv event put on by WCW from the late 80's through the mid-90's. They were  like Pay-Per-Views, but instead of having to spend twenty or thirty bucks to see them, you could watch for free. Simply amazing that this company went out of business. For my money (which is again, no money) the Clash shows are the most enjoyable wrestling broadcasts in history. They offer the full spectrum of the rainbow that is professional wrestling. There are all-time great matches (the Ric Flair vs Terry Funk 'I Quit' match from Clash 9), all-time terrible matches (Ric Flair vs Junk Yard Dog from Clash 11), hidden gems with wrestlers who never really got their due (Brad Armstrong, Butch Reed, Silver King), and, most important, some of the dumbest gimmicks and worst ideas in the history of storytelling.

I'm talking about the Ding Dongs, a pair of masked wrestlers, their costumes covered in tiny bells, who would ring a giant bell in the corner for motivation. (You're probably wondering, Did those tiny bells sewn to their costumes fall off all over the ring during the match? You bet the did!) I'm talking about the Master Blasters, a Road Warriors-knock off featuring Kevin Nash in a red mohawk and suspenders. And I'm talking about the Shockmaster.

If you've never heard about the Shockmaster, do yourself a favor and watch this clip. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7Q4EVpIFIk

That, dear reader, is the most famous flub in the history of wrestling. But it's not just the falling through the wall that makes the scene so wonderful. Every terrible part, from everyone standing with their back to the camera, to Sting's "shock the world" introduction, which someone thought was a good idea, to the mistimed explosion, to the fall through the wall, to the Shockmaster meekly grabbing his glittered  storm trooper helmet and putting it back on, to Booker T's "oh God", to the way time stands still while everyone wonders what to do, to the way the Shockmaster's movements do not match the piped in promo in any way, works together to create a magically awful whole. And now I can watch it over and over again.

Miss Fletcher, cancel my three o'clock with Leo McGary. And for the love of God, please stop tunneling through the office.  - Ryan Callahan

What We're Loving: Movies That Age Well, Adult Contemporary Television, Finding True Love, Chilly McFreeze Audio

imageEach Friday, DCH performers, teachers, and students offer their recommendations for what to watch, read, see, hear, or experience. This week David Allison travels to childhood and back again, Ashley Bright cries at work, Amanda Hahn finds her husband, and Ryan Callahan has baffling expectations.  MV5BMTgzNzk3OTg2M15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwMTIyODc5._V1_SY317_CR1,0,214,317_AL_I’m a relatively sentimental person. Whether it’s looking at old Facebook photos or just finding smaller shirts that used to fit, I enjoy looking back at the past. But when it comes to movies, I rarely take the time to revisit films I used to love; I’ve been burned too many times. For example, did you know that Blues Brothers isn’t that good? I know you’ll say that it’s sacrilegious for me to say such a thing on a comedy website, but it’s kind of boring and doesn’t hold up. Hell, most movies don’t hold up because they were made for a certain era that’s now known as bygone. Recently though, I had a breakthrough. I found a film that I loved as a child and I continue to love as an adult. That movie is Drop Dead Gorgeous. Released in 1999, Drop Dead Gorgeous is a dark comedy about a teenage beauty pageant in Minnesota. If you haven’t seen it in a while (Or, heaven forbid, if you’ve never seen it) you probably don’t recall how deep the cast of characters for this film is. I love how many memorable performances there are in such a small movie. I mean, you could probably remember that Kirsten Dunst and Denise Richards are battling it out as likeable/unlikeable caricatures. But you need to revisit this film to rediscover the adorable/hilarious trailer park friendship Ellen Barkin/Alison Janney. You need to watch Will Sasso dangle from a car door. You need to watch Adam West host a pageant. You owe it to yourself. - David Allison

MV5BMjExNzA1ODMxMV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNjY4MjQ2OA@@._V1_SY317_CR15,0,214,317_AL_I like some neat things like Japanese metal, Bukowski, and zines. I've drank David Lynch coffee. I like Avon more than Stringer. I've bought speakers from a fella off Craigslist. I need you to remember this when I tell you about what I'm loving this week. It's not underground. You've likely heard of it. It's adult contemporary television on network TV, and I love it. I love the Braverman's. Every week, I sit at my desk and cry at least once while watching (mostly just listening to) Parenthood. This week I teared up three times. Three separate times at my desk. At work. In front of other people. Listen. I'm not ashamed. It's a great show. It's a bit hokey at times and you'll feel things, but it's great. I want to be Camille Braverman when I'm in my twilight years and have a backyard just like that. Lord, bring me a Zeke Braverman to marry when I grow up. You'll laugh when watching it. You'll become invested in the characters. And that's the thing with this show, it's lead by the characters and not the plot. I started watching it as a brain rinse after watching Breaking Bad. I'd watch one or two episodes of each. I got hooked. There's some actors from HBO lining the cast if that gets you going: Peter Krause from Six Feet Under and Wallace from The Wire popped up in a few episodes in season two. Sure, it gets sappy and hits topics like cancer and having a child with autism. But its set in Berkeley and there's some pot smoking, that's cool, right? Most seasons are available on your streaming service of choice. Watch it and let's you and I chit chat about some family drama. - Ashley Bright

WWL HahnEveryone, I’m glad I have your attention. This is a very special “What We’re Loving” post for me. Today, I would like to introduce you all to my future husband, Bridger Winegar. He’s worked as an intern and production assistant for The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, and he’s the most consistently funniest person I’ve ever internet-stalked. So…no, I’ve never met him, but I know he is my one true love. Everything he has ever said or posted on any medium has made me laugh. Since it’s no longer 2010, I know it’s strange to still be obsessed with someone’s Twitter feed. But you guys, I’m obsessed with his Twitter feed right down to his bio. It says nothing but “Here we are on our third date,” and it tickles me to my core. If you ever see me spacing out or there is a lull in our conversation, there is a 95% chance that that sentence is running through my head. His weirdness is so creative, and he’s bold with his moves. The strange things you daydream of doing or posting, but never follow through on, he’ll do. His Pinterest boards are a perfect example. They make me cry from laughter. There’s an entire board with nothing but George Lucas’s neck. Another is devoted to pictures of his knee. If you decide to check out any others, be sure to take a peek at his Amazing Vocalists board. He’s goofy, strange, and delightful. I have no idea what he’s currently working on or doing, but he deserves more fame, and I’m making it my life goal to spread the word about him. So if you’re in the mood to meet someone that will make you think, “Wait what why?!” Bridger Winegar is your guy. But back off, ladies. This psycho is mine. - Amanda Hahn

steveaustinshow300x300Recently, a few people who would know recommended the The Steve Austin Show, the podcast with former pro-wrestler and current direct-to-video action star "Stone Cold" Steve Austin. Even though "Stone Cold" Steve Austin (henceforth abbreviated as SCSA) was the man who brought me back to the pro-wrestling fold after a long hiatus in the 90's, I hesitated to listen to his podcast for the same reason I hesitate listening to any podcast. Most are bad. They feature people who either pepper each sentence with a string of words such as "um" and "like" and "you know" (the vast majority of wrestling podcasts) or who try so hard to be funny that you can feel the flop sweat drip through your headphones (the vast majority of comedy podcasts). Well, it turns out that SCSA, one of the greatest promo guys in the history of the wrestling business, is really good at talking into a microphone. I have no idea why I expected anything different, except for the fact that I am an idiot. The Steve Austin Show is an entertaining listen, and not only during the interview portion when SCSA talks with guests like Paul Heyman and Dave Meltzer and William Regal about the wrestling business, but also during the opening section, when SCSA talks about what's going on in his life and what's going on in his head. Traditionally, this is the section of the podcast I skip. But not on this show. SCSA has the most important quality any entertainer can have: sincerity. I'll put up with a lot of things: self-pity, ignorance, foolishness. But if I think you're being disengenuous, if I think I'm being fed a line, I'll tune out. When SCSA speaks I believe he means what he says. Which probably makes me a mark. But at least I'm a mark with something to listen to when I'm driving. - Ryan Callahan

DCF14: Heel Turn

5903468The act I'm most excited to see at the Dallas Comedy Festival is Heel Turn. This Oklahoma City-based troupe was formed in 2013 by members Ann-Lisette Caveny, Kellen Hodgeson, Tim Huckeby, and Kelly Lawson out of "a shared sense of humor and a love of sports entertainment." As a lover of all things sports-entertainment, AKA pro-wrestling, I enjoy seeing it influence other art forms. The members of Heel Turn took the time last week to speak as one voice about great sketch, the virtues of patience, and Ric Flair. - Ryan Is your troupe named after the popular pro-wrestling form of betrayal? YES! YES! YES!

What are the similarities between pro-wrestling and improv? Pro-wrestling and improv both take a lot of showmanship. There is also a unique give and take relationship between the performers and the audience. Pro-wrestlers, like improvisers, have to take care of their fellow performers, make them look good, and always be prepared to lose.

Who would be the Four Horsemen of Comedy? We'll give the Four Horsemen of Comedy title to the guys working late night: Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, Jimmy Fallon and Seth Meyers.

Who influenced you growing up? Who excites you now? Growing up we were all big fans of sketch comedy like SNL, MadTV, The State, Kids in the Hall, even All That. Right now we're really loving how much great sketch is on television. We're very inspired by Key and Peele, Kroll Show, Portlandia and Comedy Bang! Bang!

Do you thrive off the energy at a festival? Oooohh yeeeaaahhh! There's nothing like the feeling of performing at a festival. It's a very exciting atmosphere, everyone is jacked. It's like our version of a WWE Pay-Per-View.

What's the best comedy lesson you learned recently? Patience is key. We love to play fast. We also love when improv captivates an audience with slower play and high emotional stakes. We've been working on a happy mix of the two. You know you want to see Hulk Hogan hit that big leg drop, brother. But its so much better to see him get beat down then battle back to overcome the odds with the help of the Hulkamaniacs. Then that leg drop means something.

How is the sketch show coming along? Our sketch show is a work in progress. We're writing scripts based on scenes we've improvised in shows and rehearsals. There isn't much sketch comedy happening in OKC right now, so we're excited to bring it to the stage later this year.

You can form an improv troupe of pro wrestlers and comedians from all eras. Who is in this troupe? What is the troupe's name? This troupe would be insane. We'd go with Chris Jericho, Ric Flair, Mick Foley, Dolph Ziggler, and CM Punk teaming up with Steve Carell, Amy Poehler, Will Forte, Tina Fey and Stephen Colbert. They'd be called WrestleBrainia.

See Heel Turn perform at The Dallas Comedy Festival on Friday, March 21st at 7:00PM. Get your tickets here.

What We're Loving: Unconventional Law Enforcement, Music With a Heart, Dining on Classics, Modern American Mythology

photoEach Friday, DCH performers, teachers, and students offer their recommendations for what to watch, read, see, hear, or experience. This week Julia Cotton finds character best taught with an axe, David Allison teases desert island possibilities, Ashley Bright binges on Italian, and Ryan Callahan finds inspiration from an unlikely source.  

axecopThey say not to let television babysit your kids. Well, whoever “they” is has never volunteered to babysit my 1st and 4th grader for free. Television gets the job done while I do important things (like search for cheap tickets to sold out Beyonce concerts online). My kids have stumbled upon two shows that I am proud to have as my Mrs. Doubtfire, as they both highlight creativity, imagination, and exploring life’s capabilities. They are Disney’s Phineas and Ferb ...and Fox’s Axe Cop. I won’t go on much about Phineas and Ferb. It is hilarious, very well written, and those two little boys get more accomplished in one day than most adults get done in a lifetime. I am sure you’re more concerned that I allow my kids watch TV-14 rated Axe Cop. “Mom. He is a cop, but instead of a gun, he uses an axe!” They are genuinely drawn to the unconventional nature of Axe Cop. And, sure an axe yields just as much (and perhaps more gruesome) damage as a gun, but, beyond the violence, there are prominent themes of loyalty, accountability, service, tolerance, and innovation. Axe Cop is voiced by the epitome of manliness himself, Nick Offerman. Full of the Ron Swanson “no nonsense” gravitas, this hero has only one passion: killing bad guys. My kids’ favorite episode is when Axe Cop simply draws a picture of a magical land and is able to transport there. It is a land full of formidable bad guys that need slaughtering. It is his dream land. If you still have reservations about my 7 and 9-year-old watching this ‘Animation Domination’ program, consider this: the show was created by a 5-year-old. Axe Cop is the brainchild of actual child-child Malachi Nicolle. My daughter’s reaction to this news was much like my reaction when I remember that Beyonce and I are the same age. “Mom. I’m already 7! What have I been doing?” After watching either of these shows, my kids are motivated to stop watching television for a while to try to create something of their own. This inevitably tears me away from searching for Beyonce tickets and my babysitter’s job is done. - Julia Cotton

A+Mighty+Wind+Motion+Picture+Soundtrack+A+Mighty+Wind++All+on+StageI love alliteration!  In celebration of that fact, I’m creating “Movie Soundtrack March” to showcase great comedy soundtracks that go underappreciated.  The only rule for my weekly pick is that the soundtrack has to mostly be comprised of original music.

With Spinal Tap, Waiting For GuffmanBest in Show, and A Mighty Wind, Christopher Guest and his core group of creators experienced an amazing run by producing four amazing comedies.  I could wax poetic about each of these films, but you could easily find breakdowns of them by writers far more talented than I am.  Instead of that, I’m going to focus on the soundtrack of A Mighty Wind because of it’s combination of catchy, fun songs with genuine heart and emotions.  I know this is a collection of tracks created to score a mockumentary, but this is one of the three albums I would take with me on a desert island.  Heck, it might be my number one (Please don’t send me to a desert island and make me choose).

The tracks of A Mighty Wind are provided by the three fictitious bands profiled in the film.  You’ve got The New Main Street Singers (Jane Lynch, Parker Posey, and John Michael Higgins, among others) a group that sounds and looks like what would happen if the Polyphonic Spree created 60s folk.  Their interpretation of The Bible in “The good book song” is fantastic.  The Folksmen (Christopher Guest, Harry Shearer, Michael McKean) are a trio, much like the Kingston Trio of real life folk music fame, who create great harmonies in their patient, laid back tunes.  They provide the only cover on the album, a stripped down version of The Rolling Stones’ “Start Me Up” that showcases the absurdity of the original lyrics.  The true superstar group of the album is Mitch and Mickey (Eugene Levy and Catherine O’Hara).  Their music isn’t funny. Sorry.  But it’s beautiful and earned the film an Oscar nomination for “A kiss at the end of the rainbow.”  Here’s a great clip of Levy and O’Hara performing it live at the Academy Awards.  The whole album is streaming on most music services. - David Allison

James GandolfiniSometimes you find yourself in an unintentional onslaught of some theme or person in the things you're watching or reading. During the Ice-mageddon a few months ago, my roommate and I accidentally binged on John Candy. This past week, I've consumed a lot James Gandolfini. I've been watching the Sopranos for my first time and I'm now on the 5th season. I see now why they say the Sopranos kicked off this new era of TV drama: Tony Soprano certainly opened the door for Don Draper and Walter White to lead shows as men very much in the gray area of good or bad. But the heart attack jokes about Tony are plentiful, sad, and uncomfortably on the nose. A couple of days ago, I fed my hankering to re-watch one of my favorite movies, True Romance; Gandolfini is in one of my favorite scenes. Oh, sweet Bama. And last and possibly least, I watched Enough Said, the somewhat underwhelming rom-com staring Julia Louis-Dreyfuss and Mr. Gandolfini. Avert your eyes now, if you are troubled by spoilers, but I'll try my best not to ruin any future viewing experience. I have no problem being left with questions after a movie except when I feel like the answers to those questions would have made for a stronger story. In Enough Said, we find out that Gandolfini's character archives old television shows and has watched them all repeatedly along the way. I felt like this was never really explored. In fact, the whole movie felt a little lopsided because I don't think his character was ever fully explored. I'm not good at Internet research so I cannot confirm that his untimely death impacted the movie, but it kind of felt like it did. Despite all of that, Julia L-D's performance and their chemistry make it worth watching. Although, if you've never seen True Romance, watch that first. - Ashley Bright

TV After OprahSo Ellen Degeneres hosted the Oscars. I figured I’d write about her and the way she influenced my personality when I was a nothing but a teenager making sarcastic jokes in class: her cadence, her optimistic deadpan demeanor, and the way she could deliver the most horrible news in the most casual, and cheerful manner.

After that I’d I’d dip into the Oscars, and write about watching for 25 years and not caring as much anymore, but watching out of habit, and still kind of caring because it’s still the Oscars.

That’s when the truth hit me. I had been living a lie.

Ellen is great and the Academy Awards are a fertile ground for pop culture discussion, but I’m loving one thing and one thing only this week. And that one thing is Rick Ross.

rick_ross_bet_hip-hop_awards_-_h_2012

I feel so much better having said that.

For those who don’t know, the Rick Ross story goes like this: William Leonard Roberts II was a former college football player and corrections officer who appropriated the persona of noted cocaine kingpin “Freeway” Ricky Ross and parlayed his new image into a rap empire. He’s the real life version of Gusto from the oddly-forgotten Chris Rock gangster rap satire CB4. I’ve been listening to Rick Ross in my car all the time all week. Even when I have no place to drive.  The music is pure capitalism: Make money, spend money, make money, spend money. It’s basically propaganda. And nothing inspires me more. Each time I hear “Hustlin'" I get excited and sometimes begin to dance or hop around (my form of dance,) and sing the first three verses. That music revs me up. I know it’s fake and I know it’s deeply wrong on a moral level, but dang it if it doesn’t lift my spirits without fail.

I grew up in a small New England village. We lived near the woods and sometimes saw bears.  We're run and play outside, with sticks and Jarts, all summer and fall. It was a safe, beautiful, and undramatic place. I grew up without religion. I didn’t read Tolkien. My tales of morality and adventure, my escape, came from professional wrestling, from comic books, and from gangster rap. NWA’s Straight Outta Compton was the first tape I memorized front to back. From there it was Ice Cube, and The Geto Boys, CPO, and 50 Cent and G-Unit. And Rick Ross.

The stories and images of gangster rap shaped my understanding of what material success means in this country. Also, they fostered my interest in conversational dynamics. Every rap song is a monologue. Every argument has a winner.

In conclusion, here’s Ellen Degeneres talking about bees. (jump to 15:55) - Ryan Callahan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWOdNSh3W3U